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Buy Psycho 1960 Movie Online 1080p, 720p, BRrip and MOV
Year:
1960
Country:
USA
Genre:
Thriller, Mystery, Horror
IMDB rating:
8.6
Director:
Alfred Hitchcock
Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates
Vera Miles as Lila Crane
John Gavin as Sam Loomis
Martin Balsam as Milton Arbogast
John McIntire as Deputy Sheriff Al Chambers
Simon Oakland as Dr. Fred Richmond
Vaughn Taylor as George Lowery
Frank Albertson as Tom Cassidy
Lurene Tuttle as Mrs. Chambers
Patricia Hitchcock as Caroline
John Anderson as California Charlie
Mort Mills as Highway Patrol Officer
Storyline: Phoenix officeworker Marion Crane is fed up with the way life has treated her. She has to meet her lover Sam in lunch breaks and they cannot get married because Sam has to give most of his money away in alimony. One Friday Marion is trusted to bank $40,000 by her employer. Seeing the opportunity to take the money and start a new life, Marion leaves town and heads towards Sam's California store. Tired after the long drive and caught in a storm, she gets off the main highway and pulls into The Bates Motel. The motel is managed by a quiet young man called Norman who seems to be dominated by his mother.
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HQ DVD-rip 852x480 px 1297 Mb h.264 1500 Kbps flv Download
DVD-rip 560x304 px 703 Mb mpeg4 785 Kbps avi Download
iPhone 480x270 px 569 Mb xvid 600 Kbps mov Download
Reviews
The Greatest Horror Film Ever
When you look up the phrase "Horror Film" in the dictionary .. a picture of Janet Leigh screaming in a shower should appear next to it. Undoubtedly, Psycho is the greatest horror film ever made, bar-none. The story is incredible. The acting is near perfection. The cinematography is godly. The soundtrack is perfect. It's hard to find anything wrong with Psycho. Perhaps the only imperfection I can find with Psycho is the inability to stand the test of time. One of the reasons the shower scene has become so notorious is that it's not only filmed to perfection, but because the elements of sexuality and murder are so surreal. In 1960, seeing a nude women being murdered in a shower was something that no-one had experienced yet, and was quite shocking. Nowadays, seeing Jason double-spearing two lovers having sex is nothing uncommon. I envy those who experienced Psycho in 1960 in the theaters .. those experienced the full terror of Psycho.

Aside from this though, the movie is flawless. I won't even go into to how incredible the cinematography is. One thing I think people seem to forget about the movie is the incredible soundtrack. Sound is such an important element in movies and Psycho is undaunted when it comes to sound. The only other horror movie that even comes close to using sound with such perfection is Halloween (1978).

The movie is perfectly casted as well. Janet Leigh as the beautiful Marion Crane, Vera Miles as the concerned sister, Lila Crane, and of course the unforgettable performance from Anthony Perkins as the eerie yet charismatic Norman Bates.

I would recommend this movie to any horror movie film fanatic. I would especially recommend this movie to any horror movie fan not desensitized by Friday The 13th, Nightmare On Elm Street, or Scream .. if such a fan exists.
1999-01-17
My favorite movie...
I think this is one of the best films ever made. It's a true classic. I have seen it over 20 times and I find something new in it every time I see it and it never gets boring. I'm really disappointed that they chose to remake it. But 50 years from now, people will remember the original and not the remake. A lot of people these days will be turned off by the movie because it's old and in black and white, but everyone should see. It's a technical marvel, Hitchcock was a wizard with the camera. There are also terrific performances by Janet Leigh and Anthony Perkins. This movie basically started the whole slasher film genre that John Carpenter kick-started in 1978 with Halloween. In addition to being a great movie, it's also one of the most influential ever made. Look at films like Brian DePalmas's Dressed to Kill and Halloween if you don't believe me.
1998-11-03
Brilliant Classic!
It's hard to think of a thriller more well known than Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho! Unfortunately the films popularity may spoil the shock value. Upon seeing the film for the first time I thought knowing the outcome may make the experience less enjoyable. This was not the case! I now see why Psycho is considered masterpiece! Hitchcock is a master of suspense. As the film begins, the plot immediately makes the audience uncomfortable. As Marion Crane makes off with the money, I had no idea what would happen next. Hitchcock adds in various ideas that lead me astray and even stress me out. When the police officer was questioning Marion and began to follow her, I felt her anxiety. Also when she was rushing the car salesmen I felt uneasy. This is great film-making. The emotions that Hitchcock draws out don't exactly correspond with the direct plot. After all we haven't even met the infamous Norman Baits yet and already I am on the edge of my seat with anticipation.

We arrive at Baits Motel as the rising action rolls into the main plot. What an astounding actor Anthony Perkins is! Perfect casting for a psychopathic mamma's boy! He is an actor that truly understands his role. When he peers through the hole in the wall, spying on Marion you can almost tell the moment when the mother personality clicks on. The only thing that I could have found more satisfying would have been if we saw Norman doing his mothers voice.

I love Hitchcock's style. When Marion was stopped by the police officer the way he shot the actors close-up really gave me the impression of invaded personal space and added to my discomfort. He also had great techniques for moving the camera into may different positions without cutting. When the camera follows Norman Bates up the stairs to his mothers room the camera does a 360 as it climes and we are left with the perspective of a bug on the wall.

Psycho is a classic horror/thriller that I will watch again. It provides an outstanding cast and fantastic cinematography. The timeless score that accompanies the film could not be any better.
2014-03-28
One of the best horror movies I have seen.
Let's face it, Alfred Hitchcock was a genius! He managed to capture the true demented character of Norman Bates. In the 90's Psycho does not seem to be one of the scariest movies around. But the way Hitchock managed the lighting and camera angles, made it so obvious why this movie became such a hit. I just saw this movie a few months ago, and even then, everyone I watched it with seemed delighted to scream again at the geinius of Alfred Hitchcock.
1999-05-18
Movie At The Crossroads Of Time
What can you say about a film that's been talked about to death? Just this: If you've never seen it, you owe it to yourself to do so, not because it's a way of paying homage to the one true master of modern film, but because it's so fun to watch.

Janet Leigh plays a bored office drone who decides to steal some loot from her boss's obnoxious client and parlay it into a new life with her all-too-distant boyfriend. All is going more or less according to plan until she stops in at the wrong motel, where she befriends a friendly if somewhat nerdy desk clerk only to find it causes problems with that clerk's possessive mother, who as her boy explains, "is not herself today." I'll say she isn't, and so would Leigh's Marion Crane, who maybe should have put up that "Do-Not-Disturb" sign before taking a shower.

You can feel the decade literally shifting out of '50s and into '60s with this one. Even the opening shot, where the camera looks over a Western U.S. city in the middle of the afternoon and zooms in on what looks exactly like the Texas School Book Depository overlooking Dealey Plaza. Norman Rockwell touches abound, like the decor of the motel, but look at what's going on around it. People dress well, they still wear fedoras and jackets, but in their tense conversations and hooded gazes you can feel the culture just ticking away like a time bomb waiting to explode.

Most especially, there's Anthony Perkins, who plays motel clerk Norman Bates in a very oddly naturalistic way, complete with facial tics and half-swallowed words, not the polished image one expected to see then. Just compare him with John Gavin, who plays Marion's boyfriend in the standard-actor-of-the-day way. Perkins manages to be so weirdly magnetizing, even in small moments like the way he stumbles on the word "falsity" or notes how creepy he finds dampness to be.

He shines in bigger scenes, too, like his tense chat with Martin Balsam's boorish but diligent private detective character, Arbogast, who along with Perkins and Leigh delivers a landmark performance. The way both actors play out the awkwardness in their conversation makes you literally sweat. Then again, you're always uneasy around Norman. You definitely feel wary of him right away, but you find yourself liking him, too, even when he's busy covering up "Mother's" misdeeds. Not since Bela Legosi played Dracula did you get a horror movie with such a compelling central figure.

If you are sampling the many other comments here, be sure to look up Merwyn Grote's. He makes an interesting, compelling case for how director Alfred Hitchcock used his television series as a template for "Psycho." Certainly "Psycho" looks more like early 1960s television than any of the more sumptuous fare Hitchcock had been bringing to screen at the time. Not only is it in black-and-white, not color, but the sets; a ramshackle motel, a mothbally old house, a couple of cheap looking bedrooms, a bathroom in a used-car dealership, are deliberately low class.

It's thrilling to see Hitchcock move so effectively outside his normal element, and move things along with such clinical detachment and low-key technical finesse. Thrilling, too, to realize this is one of his most accomplished products; made by a man who was experienced enough to know how the game was played, and daring enough still to break the rules; indeed, start a whole new ballgame.

Is it the best Hitchcock movie? It's definitely one of his best, right up there with "The 39 Steps" and "Strangers On A Train" and "Sabotage" and "Shadow Of A Doubt." He only once again came close to making as good a film, with "The Birds," while Janet Leigh and Anthony Perkins never escaped the greatness they helped create here. Poor John Gavin had to quit the biz entirely, and became an ambassador.

Often imitated, parodied, referenced, and analyzed to death, "Psycho" still isn't played out nearly 45 years after it came out. You owe it to yourself to pay a visit to the Bates Motel; Norman has a room ready.
2004-08-10
Hitchcock's masterpiece is the greatest thriller of all time.
Psycho is a movie with an incredible twist-turned plot that throws the audience's perspective of the film way out of proportion. It is Hitchcock's best, without a doubt. His nervous and jittery Norman Bates is outstanding. If you can guess the ending of this timeless classic, you are considered a genius in my opinion. I have watched this movie a number of times and still find it enjoyable to watch again and again, I also learn something new about the film every time I view it. Look for the various mentions of birds in the film (i.e. Marion Crane, stuffed birds). It is not a scary movie, so don't expect to be terrified of showers or of hotels-maybe this wasn't the case in 1960 though when the movie came out. It is more a thriller or a mystery, one that will still seem unsolved after you learn "who done it". #4 on my all time favorite list. It is excellence, 4 stars. -Jake Klim (jklim007@yahoo.com)
1999-01-31
Probably, the most terrific thriller made. A film that terrifies even 50 years after it's made.
Probably, the most terrific thriller made. A film that terrifies even 50 years after it's made.

To pigeonhole this as a thriller would be wrong as per me. It has a murder mystery, a psychological thriller, a huge amount of drama, and even a family backdrop. With all such elements, it would be wrong if I were to categorize this as merely a thriller. Yes, it is filled with thrills and for the 110 minutes of running time, there is hardly any dull moment.

I have seen this movie, a number of times before and each time it had a terrific impact. Also, I have always found something new, maybe a new frame, new shot or a new background sound. The discovery does not seem to stop. This I attribute to the many elements that are involved in this film.

From placing the camera, composing the shot, revealing the right emotion and making the audiences wait till the shocking aspect is revealed, Hitchcock is at his best in this film. This is indeed one of the more simpler stories he dealt. Yet, he made it so impact full that it continues to surprise audiences even today. Thanks to the music by Bernard Hermann, whose contribution to the film is very important. I cannot imagine this film without the music and I believe that it's because of the music, that the resonance was acquired.

If it's the shower scene that is most talked about in this film, I believe there are couple or more scenes that are under rated yet very impact full. Now, I do not want to reveal those and give away some details. I can simply say, I was terrified by the climax shot where the mother is shown, more than anything else.

The cast is perfect equally, Anthony Perkins does a wonderful job as Norman Bates. He is cold blooded and yet looks so deceptively humane as an extremely caring human. This film and "The Trial" are perhaps the most important films in his career.

It is the first psychological thriller of it's kind as I read in various other sites and perhaps it is also the most violent films made. Though the violence comes for less than 10 minutes, it haunts so brutally, as if it was there all through the film.

It's a definite 5/5 for one of the finest films of all time by one of the greatest directors.

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2014-05-04
Souled Out
What else can one write about a film that has been expounded by numerous film scholars? We all know about the famous shower scene, don't we? But there's so much more to "Psycho" than that. It works well as a psychological thriller but if one understands the psyche of "Psycho" it works remarkably as a horror movie (notwithstanding that we are immune to on-screen gore now).

There is a reason why director is considered to be the most important person in a movie. We have heard about the legend of Hitchcok - the great director. The same story could have been rendered to a derivative b-movie by an average director but Hitchcock took it to unforeseen greatness. He made a great use of Robert Blotch's book. Where else would you see a mainstream suspense-horror film put on the highest pedestal of cinema?

There's no emptiness in a Hitchcock film. Every scene has a purpose and underlying meaning. There could be a meta-movie on the relationship between two sisters, who we never see together on screen for the obvious reason. We get a hint of their possibly strained relationship at the end. But it's done very offhandedly, very skilfully by the master. The possibilities of analyses are endless.
2014-04-03
An intelligent thriller/horro
As with most very old films, Psycho is unlikely to have the same impact on a modern audience than it had upon its first release. So those who are watching it expecting the 'masterpeice' they are often told it is, prepare to be disappointed. Having said that, if you take Psycho of its pedestal as 'one of the greatest films of all time' (though through a historical perspective and in terms of influence, the title is richly deserved' and watch it treat it for what it is, a psychological horror, than the film remains very enjoyable. The acting performance put on by Anthony Perkins is highly believable and at times chilling and, if you have not been exposed to the shows twists and ending already, they still have the potential to shock and surprise even the most seasoned horror fan. On the subject of horror fans, it is worth a watch on that merit alone or for any fan of cinema, to see the film that has shaped cinema today more than almost any other film
2007-07-19
If there is one single film that can claim to be THE best of all time, then this is it....
*POSSIBLE SPOILERS*, if there can be in a film as famous as this....

Psycho probably has the most famous (and/or infamous) scene in the history of movies - the shower scene. The shower is in the Bates motel, run by Norman Bates, and his 'mother'. Even today, if someone looks freaky, many still say he looks like Norman Bates. If someone has a clingy or naggy mother, many a Norman Bates allusion is referred to. Psycho has become etched into modern culture and become a household name. Why?...because the film was a milestone, not just of gore, but of cinematic effect and technique. Psycho is, all at the same time, taut, mesmerising and terrifying. It is a textbook example of how to captivate an audience, and then shock them right at the very end.

The film starts by introducing a love-lorn and frustrated heroine, complete with a dead-end job, and a relationship that needs a jump start. The audience is introduced to her and her troubles; we follow her, and feel for her - then she is murdered right in front of us. The array of characters introduced in the first half of the film - the arrogant 'Texan' guy who flashes forty thousand dollars, the bumbling boss, the suspicious highway cop, the dumbfounded used-car salesman - all amount to nothing. This pioneering change in plot has the same effect as a tree which you collide with after pulling up the handbrake on a speeding car.

Then enter Milton Arbogast, the private detective who begins the search for our slain heroin Marion Crane. He investigates the Bates Motel and finds something amiss. He reports the news to the worried boyfriend and sister of Ms Crane - they all develop some trust and repartee. Then he's dead. Then enter the local town cop who doesn't believe the boyfriend's and the sister's suspicions, while all the time the audience knows what really happened and why people are dying at the hands of an 'evil old lady' who the disturbed Norman Bates is desperate to protect.

The whole film was a totally new way of writing a plot, and of manipulating a storyline. The supposed lead character is killed early on, a replacement protagonist suffers the same fate; and all the audience are then left with are the utterly desperate and confused Lila Crane (sister) and Sam Loomis (boyfriend), who have only their suspicions and fear to drive them toward finding the truth. The audience feels for them, because we know that Norman's mother murdered Marion Crane.....or at least we think we do.

Psycho only runs for around an hour and a half. It is the tautest thriller I've ever seen. Not one scene is wasted on being filler. Each scene is purposeful, powerful, and extremely economical. The pace is cracking when it needs to be, and slow and hypnotic when emotion and fear need to be emphasised; note the long scene as Norman Bates cleans up the murder scene - this allows the horror of what just happen sink in.

The script is rattling, with some flourishing dialogue that even overshadows some wooden acting from John Gavin. The cinematography is brilliant, with great use of lighting and shadows. And, of course, the directing is just simply cutting edge, even for today. Anthony Perkins does a perfectly chilling job as the psychotic Norman Bates, and Martin Balsam is a completely natural private eye. And famously, to complement these ground-breaking plot twists, are the chilling and perfectly executed murder scenes.

And finally, the chilling revelation of what really happened at the Bates Motel is kept right until the blood-curdling end, and is realised through a ear-splitting scream, a rotting skull, and a naked swinging lightbulb; a scene which leaves the audience shocked, terrified and thrilled after such a roller-coaster of a movie. For those few people to whom the 'spoliers' warning at the start of this piece applies, go and rent this film. It is simply a must for everyone. It is a defining moment of modern popular culture, and as such if there ever was a convincing candidate for the greatest movie ever made title, well then this is it.
2005-03-06
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