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Wilson
Year:
2017
Country:
USA
Genre:
Drama, Comedy
IMDB rating:
5.8
Director:
Craig Johnson
Woody Harrelson as Wilson
James Robert Miller as Bearded Man
Kimora Collins as Granddaughter
Sandy Oian-Thomas as Dog Lover
Shaun Brown as Laptop Man
Andrew Hawtrey as Commuter
Lauren Weedman as Cat Lady
Richard Ooms as Edwin (as Richard G. Ooms)
Tonita Castro as Nanny
Brett Gelman as Robert
Judy Greer as Shelly
Storyline: Harrelson stars as Wilson, a lonely, neurotic and hilariously honest middle-aged misanthrope who reunites with his estranged wife (Laura Dern) and gets a shot at happiness when he learns he has a teenage daughter (Isabella Amara) he has never met. In his uniquely outrageous and slightly twisted way, he sets out to connect with her.
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Reviews
A pleasant surprise
This film tells the story of a man who believes in human communication through conversation and physical interaction. People think he is a weirdo, but all he really wants is to connect with another soul, and be remembered by after he leaves the mortal world.

"Wilson" sounds like a silly and forgettable comedy, but it actually is way seller and thought provoking than it appears. It points out the fact that people being nice to each other unconditionally is a forgotten art, and even socially unacceptable in some circumstances. Wilson's deep desire to connect with others certainly connected and resonated with me, and I find myself reflecting upon the current state of human interaction in the modern world. The story is bittersweet, and I really enjoyed it. It's a pleasant and unexpected surprise.
2017-06-09
Nice Dramadey
Not sure why this movie would even be considered a comedy, when in fact it had a very surreal flow to the story. I love movies like this because in the world in my head, I would love to be unfiltered like Woody was, with a heart of gold and speak my mind and, not have to worry about how other people my feel. Especially with my dickhead employer. For me this was a nice dramadey, and I don't agree with the other reviews about Harrelson not be able to save this film. In my opinion I loved his character and the rest of the cast. For a man to find out he has a child giving up to adoption and then trying to build a relationship with her, and for the child not to have a built up resentment towards their biological parents, is a very powerful message of relationship on the big screen. I have a on going visitation battle right now with my ex-wife from hell, and I swear, I'm fighting everyday to keep the relationship between me and my daughter alive. So to all you reviewers who didn't like Woody's role. I'm sorry this movie spoke volume to me. And to all you mothers and fathers out there that are not in your child's life they way you should be, Its time to really step up and man up....Great film
2017-05-18
The Vidiot Reviews...
Wilson

They don't launch average folks into space is because they'd just complain the whole time.

In fact, the squeaky wheel in this comedy wouldn't even make it past the interview.

Wilson (Woody Harrelson) is a misanthropic, middle-aged curmudgeon with a lack of social grace who spends the bulk of his day antagonizing passersby about their life choices.

When he learns he has a daughter he has never met, Wilson decides to track her (Isabella Amara) and her mother (Laura Dern) down for an impromptu reunion.

But things go awry when Wilson is imprisoned for kidnapping his offspring.

Based on the graphic novel by underground artist Daniel Clowes, Wilson's sardonic script was also adapted by its creator, with good and bad results. While Harrelson embodies the titular grump, Clowes' acerbic script insults viewers' intelligence while not proving it's any shrewder.

Moreover, people who confront strangers can probably recommend the best pepper-spray.

Yellow Light

vidiotreviews.blogspot.ca
2017-06-18
It's Wilson's world. We're just living in it.
In 1944, legendary Hollywood producer Daryl F. Zanuck made a movie called "Wilson", a biopic about our highly educated, dignified and visionary 28th President – and the film went on to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. 2017's "Wilson" (R, 1:34) is NOT a remake of that film. Not even a little. The more recent "Wilson" is also not a spin-off of "Cast Away". The title character in 2017's "Wilson" doesn't have any of the qualities of that President who led us through World War I and who established the forerunner of the United Nations (except maybe for… honesty). And this Wilson has much more personality that Tom Hanks' famous volleyball buddy. This Wilson is more like a less volatile cousin of Michael Douglas' character in 1993's "Falling Down"… and is like a half-brother to Bill Murray's character in 2014's "St. Vincent". But, notwithstanding those cinematic comparisons, "Wilson", as portrayed by Woody Harrelson, is an original and unique character and one who I wish I could be like… sometimes.

Wilson is a lonely middle-aged man with a lot of faults, but he doesn't mean any harm. Wilson is honest… to a fault. He's impulsive… to a fault. He's even empathetic… to… well, you get the point. You see, it's Wilson's world and we're just living in it. He'll stop a stranger walking her dog, talk only to the dog – in a cutesy animal voice – and then act confused when the woman yanks her dog away and looks at Wilson like he's a weirdo. Wilson will ride a virtually empty train, sit right next to a businessman wearing earbuds, interrogate him about his life and not feel the least bit uncomfortable when the man forcefully asks Wilson to go sit somewhere else. Wilson is also the kind of person who will go visit an old friend in hopes of renewing their relationship but then change his mind and calmly tell his friend that he had forgotten what a joyless and unkind person his friend really is. But in spite of all this, the most important thing to know about Wilson is that he just wants to be loved… on his own terms, of course.

One fine day, Wilson decides to go looking for his ex-wife, Pippi (Laura Dern). He remembers Pippi as basically a crack whore – and that's how he describes her to everyone he encounters who he thinks might know her. With the help of Pippi's very WASPy sister (Cheryl Hines), Wilson is able to track Pippi down to her waitress job, where she is using a different name, but is still kind of a mess. Pippi is none too happy to see Wilson – or to endure the problems that his presence causes for her at work – but she still falls right back into bed with him. That's when she reveals that she had Wilson's baby sixteen years before and put her up for adoption. Wilson is beyond excited that he's a father and talks Pippi into coming with him to find their daughter, a surly, heavy-set girl named Claire (Isabella Amara). Claire lives with upper-middle-class adopted parents who neglect her… but she's still not thrilled to meet and be stalked by Wilson and Pippi. Nevertheless, Wilson is thrilled to have an "instant family" and won't give up on Pippi or Claire. And with a man like Wilson driving this train… what could possibly go wrong?? "Wilson" is wonderfully crude, funny and heart-felt. Wilson acts like we all wish we could act… sometimes. Personally, I envy his fearlessness and his ability to be himself and not care what other people think. Of course, he's also a jerk, he knows it and he doesn't care, so that part… not quite as admirable. In adapting his own innovative graphic novel of the same name, American cartoonist Daniel Clowes gives us a fully-drawn character who never really changes who he is as a person, but who still manages some growth. As directed by Craig Johnson ("The Skeleton Twins") and starring the versatile Harrelson, we get a fully realized character who is equal parts funny and obnoxious, but who still comes off as sympathetic. Besides the usual great work by the star, Dern gives a transformative performance and Amara shines in her most significant role to date. Margo Martindale, Mary Lynn Rajskub, Brett Gelman and (especially) Judy Greer contribute strong supporting performances. "Wilson" is an enjoyable foray into an uninhibited mind – and a reminder why we wouldn't really want to live that way. "A-"
2017-04-02
Film Review: Wilson
Have you ever met a person that was always so negative; a complete narcissist; a complete nut case who goes about doing all the wrong things, and makes the worst life choices ever? Well, if you do know a person like that and want to compare them to someone else as neurotic, Wilson is the movie for you. Woody Harrelson plays the titular title character with as much pizazz and life as possible while being an inherently bleak as can be.

Harrelson's Wilson can best be described as the ultimate misanthrope. Nevermind Ebenezer Scrooge, Wilson is the real deal when it comes to pessimism. Taking the world with less than a grain of salt, Wilson tackles the world with the most obvious sense of negativity, blaming people and society for all that's gone wrong in his life, including his; love life, family life and most of all, all of his own quirks and habits. Don't believe us? Just pay close attention to one very short and emotionally draining scene where Wilson visits his father on his deathbed. Like so many cases after this scene, Wilson seeks for retribution and peace in all the wrong places and times.

Clearly the oddball in his almost picturesque Minnesota community, Wilson's world shakes and shatters upon the discovery that an old flame and frequent drug user Pippi (Laura Dern) decided to keep a child they had together, who later independently decided to put the girl up for adaption. Upon the discovery of Pippi, and some sort of hope that the once love would rekindle, Wilson takes it upon himself to find his daughter Claire (Isabella Amara) and the beautiful urban family who has taken the responsibility to raise Claire as their own. As expected, in the most distasteful and awkward way possible, Wilson, along with Pippi, make it a hobby to include themselves in Claire's life almost forcefully.

Having an almost crude and grimy way of connecting with humanity as a whole, Wilson makes good-intentioned decision to involve himself in Claire's life, until things begins to spiral out of control, in familiar Wilson-fashion, leading Wilson to state penitentiary.

Luckily for us, Harrelson, one of the most versatile and interesting actors working today, allows Wilson to be a very engaging and interesting character film, focusing on the ideas of longing and loneliness. While we were fortunate enough to have the film written by Daniel Clowes, the original author of which the graphic novel the film is based off of, and Craig Johnson, director of the totally off-beat but satisfying tragic comedy The Skeleton Twins, Clowes and Johnson are able to keep the spunkiness of the almost two hour film somewhat light, keeping its flowing characters in serious need of redemption mostly entertaining and engaging.

Do not get it twisted, Wilson is a very dark and comedic film, just not dark in the sense that depression and pill popping may ensue after. While Clowes has a knack of making really funny situations and characters depressing and almost unchangeable, Wilson does progress towards a satisfying yet, in its own way, Hollywood ending. While I did long for a more in-depth look or analysis of Wilson's relationship with his father, it never comes.

While Wilson showcases the many levels and various temperaments of a very flawed and almost unlikable character, by the end of the film, one cannot help to kinda/sorta fall in love with Wilson. There is an illustrious comedic poignancy of the man who barely reaps the benefits of all of life's wonderful yet disillusioning obstacles. Decorated with slight glimpses of retribution for our beloved inane character, the world in which Wilson longs for is one that is slightly unattainable, yet charmingly whimsical.

Harrelson is an actor that can pretty well play anything and anyone. Slap on a pair of thick framed glasses, a shaggy silver-laced beard and Harrelson nails all of the nuances of a impulsive man for whom bell tolls for on a daily basis, blowing up everything and everyone in his crazy and directionless path.

Luckily for Clowes and Johnson (the original author of the source material and director) were able to assembler a quite impressive cast for a Sundance and indie darling. With the likes of Harrelson, Dern, Cheryl Hines and Judy Greer, giving a well needed spunk and kick in the ass to a somewhat joyless narrative, despite some uncomfortably appealing scenes of Wilson within a school playground and pet shop parking lot.

Overall, Wilson may probably not be your most beloved feature of 2017, nor will it be your most memorable. Luckily for us, art is always a reflection of the images we see on screen, and if there is anything Wilson does well, its reminding us that there is light at the end of the tunnel; and no matter how bad things may end up looking or really are, hope, happiness and redemption is always in store, just don't squander on the opportunities once they becomes apparent.
2017-04-04
Harrelson has a field day
Wilson (2017) *** Woody Harrelson, Laura Dern, Isabella Amara, Cheryl Hines, Judy Greer, Mary Lynn Rajskub, Margo Martindale. Harrelson has a field day as a well-intentioned misanthropic man who attempts to rekindle a romance with his ex (Dern) and learning that they have a daughter who he wants very much to be reunited with in spite of his non-filter spillage of whatever's on his mind much to his detriment. Based on Daniel Clowe's graphic novel the film attempts to make such an unpleasant sort, sort of pleasant thanks largely to the wait-and-see-how-this-goes direction by Craig Johnson in allowing the characters to show themselves for who they are, warts and all. Frequently funny and surprisingly tender at times the well-meaning protagonist scores albeit with a prickly defense mechanism that indeed can be grating.
2017-03-30
Not funny
This movie isn't funny. It's uninspiring. It's even depressing. You start this film knowing that the protagonist is going to be full of quirks and an eccentric, socially un-adapted. But in the end he's just sad. There's nothing worth watching in this film. Although Woody is a great actor, as always. It's just not an interesting story.
2017-06-11
A little too unbalanced to highly recommend it, but it is relatable (to me).
'WILSON': Three and a Half Stars (Out of Five)

A comedy-drama, based on the 2010 graphic novel (of the same name) by Daniel Clowes (who also wrote the screenplay). The film was directed by Craig Johnson, who also helmed the 2014 indie hit 'THE SKELETON TWINS', and it stars Woody Harrelson (in the title role). The movie tells the story of a lonely, neurotic and extremely honest middle-aged man, named Wilson, who goes looking for his teenage daughter, after just discovering he had one. Laura Dern, Judy Greer and Isabella Amara also costar in the movie. It's received a limited indie theatrical release at the Box Office, and it's gotten mostly mediocre reviews from critics. I also found the film to be far from perfect, but it's also at least somewhat entertaining and insightful.

Wilson (Harrelson) is a lonely middle-aged man, who's lived alone most of his life. He's neurotic, and he's also uncomfortably open, and honest, with almost everyone he meets; which causes most people to distance themselves from him. Wilson was briefly married, to another mentally unstable, and now drug addicted, woman named Pippi (Dern). Pippi and Wilson conceived a child together, years earlier, but Wilson was told the baby was aborted. When he finds out the child was born, and she's now living with adoptive parents nearby, he feels the obsessive need to meet her (Amara).

I've never read the graphic novel that the film is based on, but I did enjoy the quirky 2001 cult classic 'GHOST WORLD'; which Clowes also wrote the screenplay to (and the comic book it was based on). I do really like the Wilson character though, and I can really relate to him in many ways (but definitely not in every way). I think Harrelson does an outstanding job portraying him too, and the movie is quite involving because of it. It's a little too unbalanced though, to highly recommend it; it's just way too dark at times, in comparison to it's otherwise upbeat nature.

Watch our movie review show 'MOVIE TALK' at: https://vimeo.com/208412653
2017-03-30
Even bad-boy Woody can't make this a comedy.
When titular anti-hero Wilson (Woody Harrelson) says suburbia is a "living death," he could also be talking about himself as a curmudgeon dissing everyone he sees while crying for the family life he's never had. That extreme tonal shift characterizes his bifurcated personality and the film itself.

In other words, this film is so deaf that it is almost impossible to see it as the comedy the producers would like us to experience. Although Harrelson brings his patented innocent bad-boy persona, he can't save the result from mediocre dialogue and inscrutable characterization.

As it all begins, Wilson's voice-over is larded with misanthropy spread over the landscape from a sweet dog lover (Sandy Olan) to any young person he meets, except his long lost daughter, Claire (Isabella Amara). The latter supposedly transforms his life after he seeks her out.

Fawning over his indifferent daughter emphasizes his lack of insight, despite his constant chatter about his disappointment with modern life, frequently spot on, if not unkind. His attempt to reunite with his estimable former wife, Pippi (Laura Dern), shows the other side of solid insight. By the end of the film, I felt I was battered from one side of the ring to the other with no real winner and a definite loser in Wilson.

Jack Nicholson did a remarkable job as a reforming curmudgeon in About Schmidt, as did a score of fine actors playing Scrooge. The film Wilson just doesn't fit because it lacks character focus. That Woody brings the requisite jaded innocence is a given; that the screenplay gives him nothing to hang the character on is a flaw in an otherwise interesting concept about the middle-aged pessimist turned optimist.

Because this film is adapted by the graphic novelist, Daniel Clowes, who created the protagonist, it's fair to say Clowes caught the cartoon-like irony of the comic book but lost the sense of character consistency so much a hallmark of a mature novel set to film. If you want bleak and dark with a light touch, the work of Todd Solondz would fit your needs. Clowes not so much.
2017-03-23
True to the Graphic Novel
A slice of life is how I describe these movies, where one sees the common and mundane in a certain context.

Wilson is the story of an average misunderstood man from another time who is shown as hurting and caring but perseveres to try and find meaning in his otherwise drab existence. An average man who, by today's standards, is the bogeyman but as this poster can attest, speaks of an era where people were unique and opinionated instead of self-absorbed and indifferent.

I am looking forward to a second viewing to further see the depth of Harrelson's Wilson. And if there are other Clowes/Eightball fans out there who haven't seen Wilson yet, I recommend it. I also hope The Death-Ray and Ice Haven are made into movies.
2017-06-12
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