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Buy The Third Man 1949 Online (mkv, avi, flv, mp4) DVDRip
Year:
1949
Country:
UK
Genre:
Thriller, Mystery, Film-Noir
IMDB rating:
8.4
Director:
Carol Reed
Joseph Cotten as Holly Martins
Alida Valli as Anna Schmidt
Orson Welles as Harry Lime
Trevor Howard as Major Calloway
Bernard Lee as Sergeant Paine
Paul Hörbiger as Karl - Harry's Porter (as Paul Hoerbiger)
Ernst Deutsch as 'Baron' Kurtz
Siegfried Breuer as Popescu
Erich Ponto as Dr. Winkel
Storyline: An out of work pulp fiction novelist, Holly Martins, arrives in a post war Vienna divided into sectors by the victorious allies, and where a shortage of supplies has lead to a flourishing black market. He arrives at the invitation of an ex-school friend, Harry Lime, who has offered him a job, only to discover that Lime has recently died in a peculiar traffic accident. From talking to Lime's friends and associates Martins soon notices that some of the stories are inconsistent, and determines to discover what really happened to Harry Lime.
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Reviews
Not Exactly IMDb's Highest Rated Film (reality check)
Okay, let's get a reality check of how movies are rated here. Just a few movies rated higher than "The Third Man" ranked according to IMDb's most votes, are:

First: Shawshank Redemption..... Eighth: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly......29th: Once Upon a Time in the West...... Thirty Eighty: Mad Max

The Third Man and most every other movie ever made including those that scooped multiple Academy Awards are rated less than these. Regardless, I still find the "Third Man" a rather boring movie. Flaws?? One obvious....The choice of MUSIC! How could anyone in their right mind try to fit this constantly into a post war so-called thriller? Then the screenplay which gets so damned bogged down with the whining of the wonderful Joseph Cotton over his pal and his lust for the equally whining female (who whines over the supposedly dead Welles character). The night scenes have no people in the area except for the stars. The only excitement is provided by Orson Welles, but you have to suffer through almost two-thirds of the movie before he shows up, then all hell breaks loose. Sorry, but that doesn't redeem the whining music and whining actors that come before.
2015-06-11
Another overrated "masterpiece"
I've always thought "The Third Man" (**1/2 out of ****) one of the most overrated movies I've ever seen 4 or 5 times. Setting aside the admittedly dazzling photography and editing, we have a plot that's as difficult to follow and riddled with holes and loose ends as the one for "The Big Sleep." If we assume that Harry Lime is the "third man" who drove the truck that killed the medical orderly that was informing on him to the police (in fact, this is never made clear), wouldn't it have been a simple matter for the authorities (or anyone else) to identify the body and discover that it was not Harry Lime? Didn't the police interview the driver of the truck? How could Lime and his cohorts have possibly gotten away with the faking of his death when he was the most notorious and sought after racketeer in Vienna? The pretext for Holly Martins (Joseph Cotton) being in the city at all is awfully weak. (The narration mentions a vague "some sort of a job.") Why would Harry want a friend from America that he hasn't seen for 10 years to come to Vienna to write about his operations? The less publicity the better it would seem to me. It's also extremely ambiguous whether or not his mistress (Alida Valli) knew that Harry was dead. The first time that Martins sees Lime he's lingering outside her apartment house as if waiting to go in, and then she does everything she can to make sure that Harry eludes the authorities. In fact, her obtuse behavior throughout the film is baffling. (I'm inclined to believe that she was in on the whole deception.) Perhaps Carol Reed and co. needed audacious cinematic razzle-dazzle and oblique dialogue to cover up the fact that their story makes minimal sense. And that jangling zither music! Time and again it intrudes upon scenes that were meant to evoke tension and atmosphere and dissipates both. After the 4th or 5th repetition of the "Third Man Theme", I was ready to turn on the "mute" button! (These comments are based on the original 104 minute version.)
1999-05-10
Kept my interest all the way.
A writer travels to post war Vienna to meet an old friend but finds out he's too late.

Starring Joseph Cotten, Orson Welles and Alida Valli.

Written by Graham Greene.

Directed by Carol Reed.

It's about time I watched another old movie so I couldn't resist this when I saw it on the TV listings.

I like it. It's a good twisty story that kept my interest all the way. The acting is good and the whole thing is pretty artistic and stylish. It's pretty dated but once I got into it it didn't really matter. It's was probably well ahead of it's time considering it came out in 1949 and I was pleasantly surprised that it didn't contain any melodramatic romantic mush. It was all about the story. The mystery.

I'm sure I would have loved this if I had been around at the time and watching it for the first time I was transported back in time and I felt like I was there. Oh and I love the background music, pretty quirky stuff.

Enjoyed.

7.5/10
2015-12-23
Blithering Zithering!!
I love Orson Welles and Joseph Cotton, either together or singularly in movies. This one I saw for the first time a few years ago on TCM. They played it again this morning.

If there was a way to play a movie on "Mute," and still get the gist of the acting, I would do it. What a horrific decision to make use of a Zither as the major music score. The repetitive pounding of the same score was maddening! In case you have any tympanic membrane left, be forewarned....A "Zither" is a musical instrument that sounds like a cross between a Mandolin and a Screeching Cat. The music goes loud, then low (during a funeral), fast then slow.... but rarely stops for more than 5 minutes at a time. It's the same tune too. Forget waterboarding: just play this music score to your enemy and they'll beg you to take their secret info.

The movie is often shown in angles, as though they tilted the camera. Tall shadows of unknown persons in the city at night were supposed to add to the thriller aspect. Oh yeah, it seems that this city is always empty except for the movie crew and actors. Odd.

I thought the movie was fine, but not worthy of most accolades. Just a modest post-war thriller of sorts. Orson Welles shows up in the last third of the movie. The thrill part comes mostly from his interaction with Joseph Cotton and others, and the plot point is finally revealed. Big Deal!! Geez....I don't think I've ever spent so much room of a review on the music alone. BUT It's the music that jangles every nerve in my body and ruins what otherwise would have been a good movie experience.
2014-09-02
I'll be honest... I didn't get it.
Currently ensconced in the top fifty movies of all time on the IMDb, I just don't see it. Sure, The Third Man looks absolutely gorgeous and the ending is superb, but the rest is just passable. Beautiful to look at, but lacking any real drive or urgency.

The stuff in the sewers is good and there's some nice discussions of morality, but the film drags terribly for the first hour, where the casting (and, in a modern age, VHS covers) clearly signpost that Welles is to be expected.

Coming from the director of the superlative "Odd Man Out" and the writer of the equally superb "Brighton Rock" then I was expecting more. I don't consider myself a philistine, but, for me at least, the narrative and subtext of this one wasn't enough to sustain its attempts at brilliance.
2008-06-19
A Flawless Classic
This is a rare film that is flawless in every respect. It combines great acting and memorable characters with a fascinating story, taking place in an interesting setting and adding a creative musical score. "The Third Man" is remembered for many things - for Orson Welles' wonderful performance in his appearances as Harry Lime, for its wonderfully appropriate musical score, and for its nicely conceived plot surprises. Adding to these is Joseph Cotten's fine portrayal of Holly Martins, which holds the rest of it together - it is his character who initiates most of the action, and also through whom we view everything and everyone else.

The story starts, after a nicely done prologue, with Martins arriving in Vienna, and finding out that his friend Harry is not only dead but is accused of running a particularly destructive black market racket. Martins sets out at once to prove his friend's innocence, getting into an immediate scuffle with the police, and it seems at first to set up a conventional plot about clearing the name of a friend - but the actual story that follows is much deeper and much better. It is just right that Martins is an innocent who writes cheap novels for a living, and he gets a pretty memorable lesson in fiction vs. reality. There are some great scenes (the Ferris-wheel confrontation being as good a scene as there is in classic cinema) leading up to a memorable climactic sequence, and a good supporting cast, with Alida Valli as Anna being very good in complementing Lime and Martins. The setting in crumbling post-war Vienna and the distinctive zither score go very nicely with the story.

This is a fine, flawless classic, and while obviously belonging to an earlier era, it deserves a look from anyone who appreciates good movies.
2001-07-23
A lost world
Being in Vienna, you must of course see "The Third Man" if you have the chance, especially when it's shown with the original soundtrack. I did so.

There aren't many pictures in film history having that splendid photo, in the sewers as well as out of them. But the charm of it is in the way people are behaving, like a glimpse from a lost paradise, although the plot is frightful.

It is a beautiful story about friendship between men, one good and one evil, and of passionate love for a woman, which only grows into despair. The background is the bombed Vienna, which make things very special, like destiny looking over your shoulder. The film is probably more sensational now, then it was in 1949.
2002-11-22
Joseph Cotten is Excellent in Revolutionary Film Noir
"I never knew the Old Vienna, before the war, with its Strauss Music," opens Carol Reed's The Third Man, and we catch a glimpse of the New Vienna, with its Black Market and its Shady Deals. Joseph Cotten plays cheap novelette author Holly Martins, just arrived in Vienna to meet with long-time friend Harry Lime, who offered him a job. He instead meets with the mysterious facts surrounding the death of Lime, learned bit-by-bit from Lime's friends, a woman named Anna Schmidt, who has problems of her own (played excellently by Valli), and two British officers, Calloway and Paine. Learning, that there is more to death of Lime than there seems to be, Martins begins his investigation for the truth. This film was shot with some of the greatest, most ahead-of-its-time cinematography ever, and it creates mystery and deceit. It is complimented by the excellent use of shadows. The soundtrack is essentially one long song, which plays throughout the film, changing and stopping as the emotion calls for. It is a zither composition by Anton Karas made for the film. This is all topped off by an engrossing storyline, and a great performance by Joseph Cotten, as the ordinary man mixed up in this web of mystery.
2002-05-21
Time for Lime
Who was Harry Lime (Orson Welles)? An evil man, devil in the flesh who was responsible for the unspeakable crimes, yet brilliant, cheerful and charismatic. His most famous words, a short speech written by Welles himself, say a lot about his character and motivations:

"In Italy for 30 years under the Borgies they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock."

No wonder, we like him, even though we know what he'd done…

It has been said thousands of times about the greatest movie entrance ever – but what about his 'exit' – the fingers on the street? I think it is one of the greatest, too…

A beautiful mysterious girl with tragic past was in love with him and the unforgettable ending, so anti–Hollywood, so true to the film - was about her love that goes beyond the grave. I read that both Selznick (the producer) and author Graham Greene had initially argued for something more upbeat (Holly and Anna walking off arm-in-arm), but Reed disagreed. I am so happy that Reed won (I am sure millions of fans are, too). That was the way to finish the movie and make it much more than just typical noir. Makes the viewer think about love, friendship, betrayal, loyalty, the price one pays for them.

Amazing film - perfectly shot; almost flawless. It looks and feels like Welles himself could've made it. The influence of Citizen Kane is undeniable. The only problem I had – the music. I like it but it was very strange to hear it in the film like The Third Man. Maybe that was a purpose – instead of somber, moody, and ominous music that would be expected for the noir film, something completely different and out of place – cheerful but melancholy in the same time…

Criterion DVD is wonderful – the restored version of the film shines. There are two openings of the film available – British and American, and a lot of extras.
2004-06-18
A noir journey through postwar Europe.
Graham Greene is one of the most acclaimed authors of the 20th century, and, unlike many such literary talents, he recognized the merits of film, and took work as a screenwriter for the British film industry, including several collaborations with producer/director Carol Reed, of which "The Third Man" is the most famous. Greene's works tend to be divided into two main genres: his meditations on Catholicism in the modern world ("The Power and the Glory", for example) and his work in the spy and crime genres, the category to which "The Third Man" belongs. It is also the high-watermark for director/producer Reed, though he would only earn his Best Director Oscar some two decades later with the musical "Oliver!" "The Third Man" is one of the great achievements in film noir, and, perhaps, in film in general.

Greene's path in researching the film is in many ways mirrored by the character he ended up creating, one Holly Martins (Joseph Cotten, a prolific actor of the era who never reached the level of recognition of Stewart, Grant, or Bogart); arriving in Vienna, Greene prowled the bombed-out streets and drank in the Casanova Club, talking with local officials. He was inspired by stories of postwar shortage, organized smuggling, and the interaction of the four great powers in the early days of the Cold War. Martins arrives, having been summoned by his prewar friend Harry Lime (Orson Welles, in what is, apart from Charles Foster Kane, his most famous role), only tot find on arrival that Lime has been mysteriously killed in a car accident. The local British security chief, Major Calloway (Trevor Howard) insinuates that Harry was a notorious racketeer involved in everything up to and including murder, and Martins, a writer of pulp novelettes about gunslingers, refuses to let that explanation stand. He delves deeper into Harry's world, from acquaintances such as Baron Kurtz (Ernst Deutch, who couldn't appear less trustworthy if he tried) and Dr. Winkle (Erich Ponto), who were both present at his death, and, most importantly, Anna Schmidt (Alida Valli), a Czech living in Austria on a forged passport provided by Lime to help her avoid repatriation to Soviet-held territory. Martins' first big lead? Witness reports that an unidentified third man was present at Lime's death.

"The Third Man"'s plot suffers from a case of what TV Tropes would call a 'Rosebud': the fact that the main plot twist is common knowledge because of the movie's notoriety (and, like the original Rosebud, Orson Welles is involved). We all know that Harry Lime isn't actually dead because he is due to appear and give him famous speech about cuckoo clocks (though Welles is listed in the opening credits, so perhaps it was never that big a secret). However, there is still plenty in the movie for the viewer to be surprised about, just as "Citizen Kane" retains its lustre.

The movie has several great performances, starting with Cotten as the 'very American' (in the worlds of Peter Bogdanovich) lead man, Alida Valli as Anna, Trevor Howard as Calloway, and an enjoyable comic turn from Bernard Lee (later M to the Connery, Lazenby, and Moore incarnations of James Bond) as Calloway's batman, a sergeant who is quite a fan of Holly's writing. The performance that everyone always ends up talking about is Welles, however, in what amounts to an extended cameo (two scenes, the second with basically no dialogue).

The other notable production components include the music, provided by Anton Karas on his zither string instrument, who was hired on the spur of the moment after impressing the director at a wartime party, and it was an inspired choice, though it may jar some people expecting more traditional noir stuff. The film is filmed in the actual postwar Vienna, still a place of ruined buildings, providing for a very high level of verisimilitude.
2008-06-29
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