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Buy The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring 2001 Online (mkv, avi, flv, mp4) DVDRip
Year:
2001
Country:
USA, New Zealand
Genre:
Drama, Action, Adventure, Fantasy
IMDB rating:
8.8
Director:
Peter Jackson
Alan Howard as The Ring
Noel Appleby as Everard Proudfoot
Sean Astin as Sam
Sala Baker as Sauron
Sean Bean as Boromir
Cate Blanchett as Galadriel
Orlando Bloom as Legolas
Billy Boyd as Pippin
Marton Csokas as Celeborn
Megan Edwards as Mrs. Proudfoot
Michael Elsworth as Gondorian Archivist
Mark Ferguson as Gil-Galad
Ian Holm as Bilbo
Christopher Lee as Saruman
Elijah Wood as Frodo Baggins
Storyline: An ancient Ring thought lost for centuries has been found, and through a strange twist in fate has been given to a small Hobbit named Frodo. When Gandalf discovers the Ring is in fact the One Ring of the Dark Lord Sauron, Frodo must make an epic quest to the Cracks of Doom in order to destroy it! However he does not go alone. He is joined by Gandalf, Legolas the elf, Gimli the Dwarf, Aragorn, Boromir and his three Hobbit friends Merry, Pippin and Samwise. Through mountains, snow, darkness, forests, rivers and plains, facing evil and danger at every corner the Fellowship of the Ring must go. Their quest to destroy the One Ring is the only hope for the end of the Dark Lords reign!
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Reviews
Excusable flaws don't detract.
There's a very obvious problem when transferring any book to the big screen, namely that some of us may already have seen it.

It's not that the story holds no surprises (save for the occasional controversies that surround the fate of characters like Hannibal Lecter), it's just that many of us have already read the book, and thus we've already directed our own version of the story. We've already seen it in our mind's eye.

And this is the problem that plagues The Fellowship of The Ring. You'll see a lot of reviews here proclaiming it as nothing short of the second coming of cinema, and a few that dare to knock its serious shortcomings. Let me clear this up right now.

The first issue that many may raise is that this is not a faithful adaptation of the book. Quite right, while taking pains to ensure that they stayed faithful to the novel, Jackson et al have not simply been able to lift their screenplay directly from its pages without a few necessary changes. There is a great deal of mindfulness in the film about the portion of the audience (and it will be large) who are unfamiliar with the novels.

Accordingly a great deal more emphasis has been placed upon pacing and storytelling more appropriate to a classic film narrative. Hence we need to see Gandalf's protracted bid to escape the clutches of Isenguard interspersed with the Hobbit's journey to Rivendell. It simply isn't appropriate to expect an audience to bear with the Hobbits' journey, no matter how good the actors are or how enthralling the story is, for upwards of an hour without constant reminders of the films other protagonists OR the threat of the evil they face. Having Gandalf just turn up at Rivendell and tell his story via CGI-filled flashbacks simply wouldn't have had the necessary effect.

Secondly, the omission and reworking of characters. Yes, it was sad that Bakshi felt his animation didn't need Tom Bombadill, and given that he features strongly in Tolkien's other works this has to be frowned upon by the die-hard fanatics, but introducing diverting, but ultimately pointless episodes into the list of the challenges the Hobbits face is hardly going to keep you riveted to your seat is it? I mean, a man who stops the Hobbits being eaten, very slowly, by a tree with his power of song is just quite frankly ludicrous in this day and age. The film is already stretching the audience's suspension of disbelief as far as it can go. Hence the chaff of Bombadill is cut. He isn't relevant to the rest of the story so he can be done without. It's sad for Tolkien fans for him not to be there but there's only so much celluloid available, even with a film this long.

And yes, Arwen Undomiel never saved Frodo from the Dark Riders, but please, remember your girlfriend needs to have something to sink her teeth into as well, not just midgets and men with beards looking mean or scared as they fight monsters. So, for gender representation and a bid to prevent half the potential market (please remember that like all film, this is a product to be packaged and sold) her character gets a drastic overhaul. Go sister!

There are numerous other issues relevant to the faithfulness of the adaptation from novel to screenplay but please, let's be content with what we've got here. It's a hard task to do all this well and Jackson, along with the rest of the boys and girls at Wingnut and WETA, should be commended for what they have achieved.

That said there are some definite flaws in the film, even those that can't be overlooked by justifying the needs to relate to the popcorn and nachos audience.

Firstly, we've got the Fellowship itself. Now, Merry and Pippin, while not really being established as Frodo's friends and thus not having the same kind of bond with him as they do in the novel are moderately well integrated. However, at the arrival of Boromir, Gimili and Legolas we just get left in the dark. None of these three characters, all representing important races, cultures and locations of the world of Middle Earth are given no more than token arrival-shots to introduce them, and little or no back-story as to how they came to be where they are or why they feel compelled to join Frodo's quest. Offering their various weapons is noble, and it sounds fantastic in the trailer, but when we finally get down to it we just don't know who they are or what they're about. Accordingly we don't ever really have time to care about any of these three, save for Legolas whose fighting proficiency alone makes him stand out. Sadly, Sean Bean is allowed little more than to switch from foreboding bad guy to friendly companion and back again (thus betraying his characters ultimate fate from the first time he opens his mouth) and John Rhys Davis is left with little more to do than scowl and look short. It doesn't help that both these characters seem to get a pretty raw deal for screen time, especially Gimli, who is barely in the film at all. We won't even begin to go into the seemingly superficial relationship we see between Sam and Frodo.

All of this is indeed a shame. The film's greatest strength after its story are its strong characters. However, whereas in the book they have the space to develop and flesh themselves out here they have little more to do than look in awe at Gandalf, perhaps not with a humble air so much as a wonder that he's being allowed to soak up all the screen time.

And yes, what you've heard is true; the fight sequences are shockingly bad. Well, perhaps that IS an overstatement. The fight sequences aren't exactly bad, they're riddled with good ideas and clever moves, but the camerawork and editing is so erratic that you'll have a hard time picking out anything to inspire awe or respect. The problem here is that the benchmarks for on screen fighting have all been established nowadays by The Matrix, Crouching Tiger and The Phantom Menace, and all of these films use lengthy shots to allow us to soak up the fight imaginative fight choreography, rather than have us crane our necks and dart about the screen with our eyeballs trying to glimpse it like a rare bird or nipple-flash at a premiere.

Now, these, yet again, are only a few of the problems. There's the geography of Middle Earth, some ropey special effects moments and the clumsy ending to deal with. But you can read the books and see the film for yourself; I've already typed enough about all that here.

BUT, now that I've just spent the main chunk of this review telling you about the shortcomings of The Fellowship of the Rings as both a movie and an adaptation let me tell you, it is good, exceptionally good.

There is no denying that the storyline itself, acting, effects, props, sets and so on and so forth are all spot on. Visually the film is a triumph and WETA has now, without question placed itself ahead of Industrial Light and Magic in terms of industry leading special effects. There are bags of style to proceedings, with some sequences displaying the sheer amount of vision of the whole team to bring somewhat vague sections of the novel to life.

All parts are played to perfection by the cast, and the casting is literally some of the best and most appropriate seen in years, none of this who-hot-and-who's-not Jerry Bruckheimer trash, it's a case of the best possible person for the part at every stage of the film. We'll give particular credit to Sir Ian Mckellan, Christopher Lee, Ian Holm and Elijah Wood again here. No doubt they've had scores of favourable and loving reviews already but these performances truly are worth mentioning just once again.

The film is a masterpiece from start to finish. Yes, it does take perseverance, no it's not entirely faithful to Tolkien's work and there are some serious flaws, but in a year that has been so barren of even five decent mainstream movies I think it's safe to say that no matter when this film had been released it would have outshone its competitors.

2001-12-19
Embrace the power of the Ring...
I've always loved fantasy and science-fiction novels, and I'm very grateful for that, since the movie adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring is one of the reasons I fell in love with movies (the other reasons are Spider-Man, Casablanca, The Godfather and Pulp Fiction), it's so incredibly excellent. Some people refer to the Lord of the Rings trilogy as my generation's Star Wars (I was 12 when TFOTR was released), but I actually think it's better than Star Wars, and basically for one reason: the way director Peter Jackson has brought Tolkien's beloved classic to the screen.

Jackson has perfectly understood CGI is nothing but a tool that enables the filmmaker to tell stories more easily: while in Star Wars we see dozens of different worlds, which are visually stunning but appear for only a couple of minutes (or seconds), in LOTR everything we see is there to make sure the story goes on. Oh, another important thing too: in this movie, plot and character come first, the visuals are added later. The director takes his time to introduce the various inhabitants of Middle Earth and the chain of events that will change their lives forever. The movie is almost three hours long, so what? It's a story we really care about, and the characters make us feel for them every single moment: we cheer with Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) when he learns he won't have to face his difficult task alone; we laugh with them when Merry (Dominic Monaghan) and Pippin (Billy Boyd) make fools of themselves; we cry and worry with them when things start getting bad...

That's probably also the reason for which this movie is superior to its sequels (N.B. I'm talking about the so-called "theatrical versions"): in parts 2 and 3, important moments of character development are ditched in favor of long, breathtaking battles, and the audience knows something's missing. That's not the case of The Fellowship of the Ring: the extended version is better, that's true, but the first movie is the one with the least deleted minutes, and therefore the one that feels less incomplete than the others.

As I said before, Jackson values characters more than effects, and he uses the latter only to tell the story more successfully, so that the world where those people live will look more realistic on screen; now, since the characters are more important, the cast is a crucial element, and luckily the actors chosen for this movie are pure perfection: Elijah Wood, Sean Astin, Dom Monaghan and Billy Boyd are career-best as the four hobbits, the most vulnerable members of the Fellowship, therefore the ones we care about the most; Viggo Mortensen is 100% convincing as the conflicted, layered Aragorn; Ian McKellen gives Gandalf the Grey the warmth and wisdom he deserves, and finally, Christopher Lee is just THE only actor who could flawlessly play the Darth Vader-like good-turned-bad Saruman, proving once again he's the N°1 choice when it comes to casting someone as the really bad guy. Like Dracula, he has gloriously resurrected to spread horror another time.

An amazing beginning for an even more amazing trilogy, perhaps the best I've ever had the pleasure to see. Should have won Best Picture of 2001 (as well as Director and Adapted Screenplay).

One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them... well, you know the rest!
2005-12-11
Awesome
I know it's been out for a while, but it is still awesome. Great cast of actors. Awesome work!! I have not enjoyed a movie so much in my life, I could watch it over and over and over if I had the time, but of course I have to do something constructive with my life and my employer won't stand for it.
2003-02-23
Big Surprise
Before this movie was made, I had barely even heard of the Lord of the Rings trilogy. When the movie came out, it got such rave reviews and looked so interesting that I was quite eager to see it. When I finally did see it, I was SO impressed. The story is absolutely enthralling, the special affects were amazing, and the acting was superb. This movie really got me more interested in all the actors playing the hobbits, and also Ian McKellen, actually to be honest, I REALLY enjoyed all the actors, especially, Viggo Mortensen(playing Aragorn). There is not one element, one scene in this movie, (in my opinion) that could use any improvement. I would strongly recommend this movie to any who enjoys the fantasy\science fiction, even if you have not read the books. This is the best movie I have ever seen, and I can't wait to see the rest of the trilogy.
2003-02-23
An epic worthy of it's hype
The long awaited live action adaption of the classic Tolkein novel Lord of the Rings more than justified the massive hype surrounding it. Simply put, it is one of the best movies I've ever seen. I have not been so utterly blown away by a film in a long time like I was when I saw this. Every, and I mean every, aspect of this film is executed flawlessly. The ensemble performances are truly fantastic, especially by Wood and McKellan. All I can say is I can't wait for it to be released on DVD and I can't wait for The Two Towers and Return of the King to come to theatrical release. I think we have finally seen the arrival of a trilogy that matches the magnitude of the original Star Wars trilogy. 10/10
2002-07-02
Frodo Row Your Boat Ashore
"With the help of a courageous fellowship of friends and allies, Frodo embarks on a perilous mission to destroy the legendary 'One Ring'. Hunting Frodo are servants of the Dark Lord Sauron, the Ring's evil creator. If Sauron reclaims the Ring, Middle-earth is doomed," according to the DVD sleeve description, "Winner of four 'Academy Awards', this epic tale of good versus evil, friendship and sacrifice will transport you to a world beyond imagination."

Reading the original J.R.R. Tolkien novels was an intellectual rite of passage; whilst young, you read and enjoyed "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy willingly - prepping with "The Hobbit", of course. "It's a job that's never started that takes the longest to finish," someone said. Writer/director Peter Jackson's "The Fellowship of the Ring" is the first of an extremely well-produced trilogy. Understandably, it's made into a special effects extravaganza, without taking many breaths for thoughtfulness.

"The Bridge of Khazad-Dûm" (#30 on your DVD menu) sequence is a highlight; it climaxes with the wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and the demonic Balrog (CGI) falling into an abyss, from which return seemed impossible This was one of my most memorable "Lord of the Rings" reading experiences - a future without Gandalf was unimaginable. Mr. Jackson and company recreate some emotional scenes extraordinarily well. At one time, it seemed impossible to think that such literature could be brought to cinematic form.

******** The Fellowship of the Ring (12/10/01) Peter Jackson ~ Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Viggo Mortensen, Orlando Bloom
2009-11-09
Speechless
Upon first seeing this film, I was astounded. There were no words. And still, no words come at times to describe the beauty and majesty of this great achievement in modern cinema. Whoa. That was just a lot of words. Today must be a good day.

Complete with a great cast, a great crew, great visual aspects, and a great script, this film is simply wonderful. When put together with the other two in this trilogy, it should be a greater thing in itself than the Star Wars trilogy ever was. A classic for a new generation.
2002-08-07
I love this film!
I have always loved the books written by J.R.R. Tolkien, but I never expected that anyone would ever make a film out of it, or that it would be such a big success! Peter Jackson made the books real to me, and I try to watch it at least once a month, if not a lot more than that! The entire cast was perfectly placed, and they all worked so good together, that I am so mad that they don't let the other two films out on DVD right away!
2003-03-10
An Amazing Achievement
'The Lord of the Rings' is one of my favorite books, I have read it several times, and remember thinking the last time, about 3 years ago that if I made a film I'd want to make it of this, but wouldn't it be almost impossible. You can then imagine how strong my expectations were when I went to see the eagerly awaited first installment.

This film impressed me hugely, more than anything else because of how true it was to my imagination, both in the characters as well as in the effects and setting- a sentiment I have heard consistently from other fans of the books. Elijah Wood brought across the character of Frodo with the kind of haunted, frail courage that Tolkien captures so well in the books. Nor could I find any fault at all with Ian McKellan's Gandalf, Viggo Mortensen's Aragorn, and Sean Bean's Boromir, all of whom I thought were portrayed excellently. I could pick out instances where I did think, 'no, that's not right', however their seldomness in number would only serve to illustrate the excellence of the overall portrayal. One thing that did stand out for me was Cate Blanchett's performance as Galadriel, the part itself became so perfunctory in the film that to me her alternation between benevolent seer, and figure of potential terror seemed little more than a slightly confusing detour with no real connection into the plot other than as a vehicle for a glimpse into the future. But that was it.

I thought that the points where Jackson did deviate from the text were completely the correct ones to do so. Shortening the opening Shire scenes and cutting out the whole Tom Bombadil bit was great since frankly they bored me slightly in the book anyway. Also, expanding the role of Arwen was a sensible decision.

However this film is by no means above criticism. The dialogue was in my opinion terrible and purely there to drive on the plot. Normally this would ruin a film for me (as in "The Matrix"), making it almost intolerable to view, however fortunately here it proves little more than a minor irritation. Also, the film seemed overall to be excessively plot-driven and at times a mad dash from one action scene to another, the characters, for all their truth to the book did seem flat and sometimes little more than stereotypical fantasy characters. This is perhaps my major quarrel with the film- I would have liked these characters to have come alive as people in a way that was made impossible by the sparseness of the script and the rollercoaster nature of the plot. In general the whole film lacked the depth of context that I think distinguishes Tolkien from other fantasy writers. However to have achieved this would have required a very different movie, and you can't fault an action film for being an action film.

This movie is undoubtedly not for everyone. A lot of people just don't get fantasy- other than Lord of the Rings, I don't particularly either. However in my opinion Jackson really has made an incredible achievement- his and Tolkien's vision carried through suberbly by a breathtaking setting and stunning special effects, as well as by a cast clearly as enthralled as he was. He has taken on a huge task, and is dealing with it with breathtaking success. Check for other user comments.
2003-04-13
Embrace the magic
It is with no surprise that Peter Jackson's The Fellowship of the Ring film has received such mixed critics. Many viewers refer to it as being childish, boring and uninteresting. Seems to me that it is bound to the same fate of Tolkien's books, destined to be a target for the same type of misunderstandings that keep attacking this literary masterpiece many decades after it's first publication.

Having read the books several years ago, I went to see this `impossible' film when it came out with many doubts on my mind. I really liked it, but left the theater with as many doubts as I had before. Was it perfect? Well, maybe not, but what an achievement. After watching it a few times on DVD, and thinking about it for some time now, I find myself loving this film more and more. Let me tell you why...

The Lord of the Rings is a fairy-tale of myth and fantasy. Peter Jackson directed a film that was considered, for a very long time, impossible to make, and not only for technical reasons. The narrative roots are incredibly long and detailed, and the storyline is deeply connected with the creation of a fantastic continent from a time unknown called `Middle Earth'. It's author, Tolkien, dedicated a considerable part of his life developing this continent's background, it's mythology and origins, it's different kinds of people, cultures and languages, and therefore it's geographic references are determinant to the unfolding of the story of the One Ring.

Peter Jackson went out to achieve the impossible and came out with a recreation of the original that is pure and true to the story in every detail. The first time the four hobbits meet a black rider on the road, for example, is absolutely faithful to the feeling of the book. The assault of the riders at Weathertop is another great example, and it captures that feeling of danger, density and atmosphere that are the main characteristics of the tale. Jackson also took some liberties with the story, and made some right choices along the way. If the so called `purists' may not approve the removal of Tom Bombadil altogether, it should be comprehensible that the travel from Hobbiton to Rivendel is a very long and detailed one and could easily make a movie on it's own. I felt more uneasy with how short the Council of Elrond was. In the book, the council is where the whole story of the rings is first explained, and many passages from the past ages of Middle Earth are unveiled. It is a fascinating moment of the story, that had to be shortened for obvious reasons. Still, after some consideration, I now agree with the options made by Peter Jackson, and think that the movie prologue narrated by Galadriel was the wisest choice. The magic is all there when Gandalf shuts his eyes the moment Frodo stands in the council and says `I will take the ring'. It is there at Moria's Gate, and at the fall of Boromir. It is a powerful film that doesn't fit the rhythm of the standard Hollywood action movie. It is a film that breeds, that takes time to unfold, it's tale branching in every direction.

I could go on and on, talking about all the different elements that bring this film close to perfection, but I'll end saying that deep down, this is not about action, beards and big monsters. The greatest thing about this film, to me, is that it brought me back to a time when I was in love with a different world where everything was possible. Reading The Lord of the Rings night after night, I came to understand what this thing of `mankind' really was all about. The corruption of absolute power, the importance and value of friendship, the inevitability of growing up, the strength of hope... That this film could capture that magic, and be a new bearer to it's message of humanism, is a statement to it's greatness. Gandalf's words, that even the smallest person may change the course of the world, and have a part to play in the destiny of all, are immortal.

In the end, this is a wonderful film, but that doesn't mean you are going to like it. I cannot tell you what it is like to see this film if you don't know or love the book. But I hope it may plant a seed on your heart to discover a great world of fantasy, beauty and humanity. I believe Tolkien would have liked that.
2002-10-08
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