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Buy Il buono, il brutto, il cattivo 1966 Online (mkv, avi, flv, mp4) DVDRip
Year:
1966
Country:
USA, Italy, Spain, West Germany
Genre:
Action, Adventure, Western
IMDB rating:
8.9
Director:
Sergio Leone
Eli Wallach as Tuco
Lee Van Cleef as Sentenza
Aldo Giuffrè as Alcoholic Union Captain
Luigi Pistilli as Father Pablo Ramirez
Enzo Petito as Storekeeper
Claudio Scarchilli as Mexican peon
John Bartha as Sheriff (as John Bartho)
Antonio Casale as Jackson / Bill Carson
Sandro Scarchilli as Mexican peon
Benito Stefanelli as Member of Angel Eyes' Gang
Angelo Novi as Monk
Storyline: Blondie (The Good) is a professional gunslinger who is out trying to earn a few dollars. Angel Eyes (The Bad) is a hit man who always commits to a task and sees it through, as long as he is paid to do so. And Tuco (The Ugly) is a wanted outlaw trying to take care of his own hide. Tuco and Blondie share a partnership together making money off Tuco's bounty, but when Blondie unties the partnership, Tuco tries to hunt down Blondie. When Blondie and Tuco come across a horse carriage loaded with dead bodies, they soon learn from the only survivor (Bill Carson) that he and a few other men have buried a stash of gold in a cemetery. Unfortunately Carson dies and Tuco only finds out the name of the cemetery, while Blondie finds out the name on the grave. Now the two must keep each other alive in order to find the gold. Angel Eyes (who had been looking for Bill Carson) discovers that Tuco and Blondie meet with Carson and knows they know the location of the gold. All he needs is for the two to ...
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Reviews
"You may run the risks, my friend, but I do the cutting"
This week I was fortunate enough to see 'The Good, The Bad and the Ugly (1966)' (namely, the 2003 extended English-language version) in the cinema, perhaps the only place that Sergio Leone's classic Spaghetti Western can be properly appreciated. This was my second viewing – the first being in 2006, when my interest in cinema was still in its infancy – and, just as Leone's film gained status only in subsequent decades, my admiration has since grown substantially. By the early 1960s, the Western had become a tired genre, and even the best American entries {such as Ford's 'The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)'} could more closely be described as somber rather than thrilling. Leone's low-budget Italian productions breathed new life into the Western, the director's highly-stylised (and purely cinematic) film-making style tackling the recently-emerged Revisionist Western sub-genre with a cheekily-parodic sense of humour.

Though 'The Good, The Bad and the Ugly' clearly identifies each of its three protagonists with a titular adjective, the separating lines are decidedly blurred. Blondie (Clint Eastwood) is the archetypal anti-hero, a laconic, cigar-smoking bounty-hunter who makes every word, and every bullet, count. Tuco (Eli Wallach) is a slimy opportunist, a bottom-dweller whose unabashed enthusiasm – especially opposite the apathetic Eastwood – makes him an oddly-likable character. Angel Eyes (Lee Van Cleef) is a crafty, intelligent schemer, greed and contempt mixing behind those cold, steely eyes. Leon's film revolves almost exclusively around these three characters, and the American Civil War is utilised purely as a historical backdrop. As was the director's style, the film is a triumph of contrasts: an epic period of American history is used merely as a stage for an intimate battle-of-wills between three determined men with their own selfish aims.

Contrast, too, is evident through Leone's camera lens. Few directors (perhaps David Lean or Sergei Bondarchuk are his only true rivals in this field) have more inspiringly utilised the cinema screen as a canvas. Leone switches between landscapes and portraits, at times cutting unexpectedly from a distant long-shot to an extreme close-up of Eastwood's sweaty brow, his eyes narrowed and alert. I wrote in my review for 'A Fistful of Dollars (1964)' that that Leone's landscape was the human face. Unlike Ford, to whom setting was significant (one reason why he so adored Monument Valley), Leone's Westerns unfold in an anonymous landscape, dry and unremarkable and unforgiving. Colour is instead injected through Ennio Morricone's score, perhaps the most memorable ever composed for a film. The composer's contribution is uniquely cinematic, refusing to linger in the background and instead serving to overwhelm and enhance Leone's imagery.
2010-03-02
Very good, but...
There's this fellow with no name who is hanging around with a ne'er do well called Tuco - No Name collects a reward for Tuco then, just as they are about to hang Tuco, No Name shoots the rope and they escape. This scam serves them quite well until a stolen army payroll enters the equation at which point, together with a ferrety-faced individual, the three of them find themselves reluctant allies and less reluctant antagonists as, against a backdrop of the Civil War, they try to track down the payroll.

Let me set out the bits which I would quibble with. The Spanish locations - undoubtedly photogenic - don't look even slightly like the places they are supposed to represent. The dubbing on the non-English speaking cast has some places where the English speech is hopelessly out of synchronisation with the mouth movements of the cast members. And, sad to say, it does ramble somewhat.

So what is good about it? Well, Ennio Morricon's score is wonderful, and I don't just mean the seminal theme: it is full of haunting melody and dramatic arrangements. The set pieces are brilliantly staged, especially the bridge sequence and the entire closing section. Plus, notwithstanding that this is his third appearance, it is an education to see Eastwood's seminal character cemented into iconhood, especially as his costume is assembled bit by bit throughout the film.

Take no notice of my quibbles! It is a classic!
2014-02-17
This movie is Flawless...this movie has no parallels...this is the Best one I 'll ever see.
I want the rating meter to allow me to rate it more than 10. I love this epic movie. Patiently shot and created , it exudes a scent of eternal beauty. This is my friends every movie goer's delight. A movie which can't be bettered. Full of outrageously funny puns and comic lines; made with an audacious appetite for cinematic patience, this movie has it all.

The background score is classic. I still get charged when I see the final scenes of the movie playing to Ennio Morricone's The Trio.

Deep dialogues an unbelievably smooth screenplay this movie is perfect.

It's detractors complain that some parts are overdone and are too clichéd. Well those things hardly matter when you have Blondie, Tuco, Angel Eyes , The drunk Army Captain on screen exhibiting something completely out of this world in terms of cinematic achievement.

I have never seen a better genre in movies than westerns and in that genre this movie stands out. This movie is undoubtedly the greatest one ever made in any genre.
2010-03-04
film making of the highest order
The whole picture is superb, but the closing twenty minutes or so are simply breathtaking. From when the dust clears after the bridge blows, the movie develops a momentum that doesn't let up until the very last shot.

The dying soldier; Tuco being blasted from the horse and crashing into the gravestone; Tuco running round and round the graveyard (how was that shot?); the way the three protagonists come together; the shootout; Tuco and Blondie playing out their last confrontation; and then a final wail,the guitars come in one more time and Clint just rides hell for leather out across the desert.

It's cliché to say "they don't make 'em like they used to" but not only don't "they", "they" wouldn't have a clue how to make a movie like this any more.
1999-08-29
Rich Visual Epic
Long before Clint Eastwood would wince his way into the ham-hock Hall of Fame as Over-Rated Actor and God-Awful Director he was used to perfection by Director Sergio Leone in his spaghetti-Western masterpiece, "The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly."

This is a film so visually rich it reads more like a novel than a motion picture. Leone gets off on the grit: the beard-stubble, the sun-chapped lips, battered hat-brim and dirty leather boot. Not only is this the greatest Western ever made it may also stand as the greatest visual story ever committed to film. Leone is so genuinely fascinated by this period and its mythology that every frame is full and compelling... action occurs in both sprawling long shots and lightning bursts of quick-cut gunshot. Eli Wallach is amazing as Tuco, the human rodent, and Ennio Morricone's haunting score adds tremendous humanity to the proceedings.

I have to admit I am not a fan of most American Westerns... the vast majority of them seemed to be disposable action flicks shot at the same five ranches using the same twelve horses. "The Good" elevates the Western to a higher art form than even John Ford or Howard Hawks' greatest films... it would serve as the visual blueprint for almost every Western to follow, and I highly suggest watching the movie with a glass of cool water nearby... you'll be thirsty.

The perfect Saturday-afternoon movie (but be sure to watch in Letterbox!) "The Good, The Bad & The Ugly" is an enduring cinematic classic not to be missed... one of the greats.

GRADE: A+
2009-04-01
Wasted opportunity
Morricone's stunning score is too good for Leone's film. Now, the acting is good, the casting is perfect, the idea is great. So what went wrong?

For one, it feels dull. It has a slow pace and often times it becomes irritating. Moreover, some of the scenes have little, if any relevance for the plot. This has an alienating effect on the audience.

Another problematic thing is the humour. The film tries to insert humour quite often, but these attempts by and large fail and scenes come across as silly rather than funny. Too often one is left feeling disappointed that the punch line failed to materialize.

The action scenes are quite dull as well. The huge numbers of extras in uniforms and all the guns and explosions fail to create any real sense of war. They remain as a rather pale mat painting in the background. As for the revolver duels, they too are surprisingly dull. Granted, the final showdown is quite memorable, but the others are unfortunately rather unimpressive.

There is also a lack of logic, which is quite frustrating. There is little in the film that makes sense, the decisions made by characters are often absurd, and the audience is left wondering what actually happened and why.

Regarding protagonists, 'the ugly' steals the show, but Eastwood is not given enough things to do. His character remains undeveloped, although Leone makes some attempts to give him depth. Also, the antagonist is not menacing enough. He is given too little screen time and never manages to be a genuine threat.

Unnecessary gratuitousness. This is something Spaghetti Western is known for, and something I tend to dislike. There is a scene where Tuco is beaten about in order to extract information from him, and this goes on forever for no reason. Throughout the film there are moments where we are forced to endure protracted, often violent scenes that may seem grand and intense, but carry no emotional punch and have little relevance in terms of advancing the plot. Leone does this time and again, and it is clear that he experiences these scenes in a way that is peculiar to him, but which remains a mystery to many viewers. Too often I feel that he is aiming for an emotion I simply do not experience while watching the film.

I will not go on about what else is wrong. I will conclude with some more positive things. As I said, the music is superb and does wonders for the film. Also, I like the general tone. His depiction of the warring parties may be inaccurate, but Leone does manage to create a sense of dread and disgust. The scene in the graveyard, accompanied by Morricone's score is excellent. The counterpoint between the greedy misfits in search of buried gold and the solemnity and horror of the huge graveyard littered with graves of men who died for their ideals is quite effective.

The story is definitely a good one, shame the actual script is too weak and Leone's sensibility and sense of humour are, at least in my view, somewhat peculiar.
2014-10-17
The most influential western ever.
By far the most ambitious and unflinchingly graphic western ever mounted, THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE UGLY is an engrossing, explosive movie shot through with a volatile mix of myth and realism.

Clint Eastwood returns as the invincible 'man with no name' or 'blondie'. This time teaming with two gunlingers (Lee Van Cleef and Eli Wallach) to pursue a fortune in stolen gold. But teamwork doesn't come naturally to such strong-willed outlaws, and they soon discover that their greatest challenge may be to stay focused - and stay alive - in a country ravaged by war. Forging a vibrant yet detached style of action that had not been seen before, and has never been matched since, THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE UGLY.

back cover.

10/10
2007-06-16
Fantastic, legendary masterpiece
In New Mexico Territory circa 1862, a mysterious bounty-killer known as "Blondie" (Clint Eastwood) and a shifty Mexican bandit, Tuco Ramirez (Eli Wallach), run a con job wherein Blondie turns Tuco in for money and then rescues him, splitting the reward money. However, the two engage in numerous double-crossings against each other, until stumbling across a dying Confederate soldier (Antonio Casale) who gives each man a clue to the location of a hidden cache of gold. Tuco and Blondie re-form their alliance to find the gold, only to find that Angel Eyes (Lee Van Cleef), a ruthless hired gun, is already after the gold. The three men form a frequently-changing series of alliances to get at the gold, and they must avoid the Union and Confederate armies operating in the region.

"The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" is a landmark film in many respects. Its cultural influence is nigh-impossible to overstate, with its iconic musical score by Ennio Morricone, three memorably amoral protagonists, the close-ups, vast landscapes, and the title itself, all of which are instantly recognizable icons of cinema, having been referenced and replicated time and again in movies, TV shows, and even commercials. It is Sergio Leone's first truly great film, a transition from the low-budget Spaghetti Westerns ("A Fistful of Dollars", "For a Few Dollars More") to the big budget, artistic epics that Leone would make for the rest of his career ("Once Upon a Time in the West/America"). It is also a film of utmost importance to me; after watching this movie as an eleven year old, admiring its wonderfully quirky characters, style, music, and breath-taking cinematography, I realized for the first time that I wanted to devote my life to films, be it watching them, writing on them, or hopefully making them.

"The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" is a full-blown epic, and one with an interesting subtext. We see three completely amoral characters whose crimes - robbery, murder, and racketeering - are minor compared to the brutal carnage we see the Civil War inflicting. Taking place during the little-known Sibley Campaign in New Mexico, the film is not a documentary depiction of the war, but an allegorical one. This was the first total war, and Leone uses it as a metaphor for conflict in general, with faceless mass slaughter inflicted by rifles, machine guns, and artillery. Blondie, Tuco, and Angel Eyes' transgressions are minor compared to a brutal, Auschwitz-like concentration camp, spies being executed in the streets, towns being shelled, and vicious, stalemated trench warfare over a "flyspeck" of a bridge. Even our amoral heroes have amounts of humanity which set them apart from the machine-like slaughter around them; Blondie saves Tuco's life and comforts dying soldiers of both sides; Tuco struggles with a mixture of affection and hatred for Blondie, and his troubled relationship with his brother (Luigi Pistilli), and even Angel Eyes shows disgust at the carnage he sees.

The movie is extremely episodic, the plot only secondary to the adventures of these characters. Leone's wonderful direction gives the film a fairy-tale quality, with an appearance of realism while being fanciful and at times almost surreal. The movie contains extremely memorable set pieces: the lengthy opening, with three gunmen going after Tuco; the "carriage of the spirits"; the prison camp; a shootout in a town under shellfire; an epic Civil War battle; Tuco running excitedly through the cemetery; and, of course, the unforgettable climactic "triello". Tonino Delli Colli's cinematography is simply breath-taking, with desert landscapes as impressive as David Lean's films contrasting with the most extreme close-ups imaginable. Carlo Simi's set designs, from shelled-out towns to prison camps to the cemetery, is breath-taking. And Ennio Morricone's score is, for lack of a better word, one of the most amazing ever written, the instantly recognizable theme tune and other brilliant pieces creating the movie's indescribable atmosphere.

The cast creates unforgettably iconic characters. Clint Eastwood is back as the Man With No Name, here much more human in this film despite retaining his cool, detached, shifty nature. Lee Van Cleef, who had played a likable character in Leone's previous film, now plays one of the most memorably evil characters ever. Aldo Giuffre, Antonio Casas, and Luigi Pistilli are effective in supporting roles, and Leone's usual stock cast - Mario Brega, Benito Stefanelli, Al Muloch, Aldo Sambrell, and many others - create their own iconography. But it's Eli Wallach who steals the show, as the scenery chewing Tuco, a shifty, double-crossing, foul-mouthed bandit who manages to be the most likable and human of the cast despite his faults; truly, one of the most memorable film characters ever.

"The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" is one of the most well-known and influential movies ever made, and with good reason. In terms of style, it is an absolute triumph, being one of the most amazingly made movies ever made. Those only familiar with the movie for its cast, its score, or peripherally through its iconic stature, are missing out on one of the most breath-taking cinematic experiences ever. Thank you, Sergio Leone.

9/10
2007-07-10
Sergio Leone's penultimate Italian-western; a film that gets better with each passing year...
...and though those last several words could also be attributed to Leone's "Once Upon a Time" films (West and America) as well as the other pieces in his trilogy of films with Clint Eastwood- Fistful of Dollars and For a Few More Dollars- arguably this is the most ambitious and spellbinding one of the bunch, and one that has inspired (i.e. Quentin Tarantino, Sam Raimi, Robert Rodriguez) and will most likely continue to inspire filmmakers and fans into the 21st century. There's something in The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly that's nearly (or perhaps is) mythical in it's craft, certain scenes come off as being more than relevant and exquisite for that scene/sequence- it transcends into aspects of humanity.

For example, in the first part of the film (this is after the extraordinary introductions to Tuco, played by Eli Wallach, Sentenza or 'Angel Eyes', played by Lee Van Cleef, and as Blondie by a 35/36 year old Clint), Joe gets Tuco out of a hanging, which is something of a regular practice for them, but Joe decides to leave his 'buddy' out in the desert to walk the rest of the way back into town. A little later, the situation gets reversed, as Tuco has a horse and water and Joe doesn't, and they both go to cross the desert. Leone decides to not follow Tuco coming back to town as much as he follows in earnest Tuco and Joe going across that desert, as Joe starts to burn and dry up, going towards a story that will soon unfold. There is something to these scenes that I can barely describe, that they're executed in the mind-set of a Western, but in the abstract Leone lets the audience know this is a story that is bold and bigger than life.

What makes much of the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly such a huge success is the trust Leone had in his own style he spun into his own after the first two westerns, his trust in his collaborators, and in his leading players as well. I, for one, had to mistakenly figure out that it is near depressing to watch this film on a regular VCR tape due to the pan & scan process. There is such a clear, distinct visual scope that Leone and camera director Tonino Delli Colli achieve that it's practically a must to get the DVD (preferably the extended version, which was Leone's original cut more or less). The editing, too, is unique in many sequences (the climax is the most noted and memorable). The score, with usual collaborator Ennio Morricone, is one of the landmark movie scores, and themes, of not just in the western genre but in all movie history. And the three main players who take on the screen have their own chops to show off: Eastwood, technically, was playing a Joe that took place before Fistful of Dollars, yet by this film had it down to a T (it's still my favorite performance from him, despite having few words and reactions); Cleef's cold, cunning Angel Eyes steals the scenes he's in; ditto for Wallach, who gets under the skin of his co-patriots as much as he sometimes does under the viewer's.

Overall, The Good, the Bad and Ugly, is an entirely satisfying western, at least one of my five favorites ever made, and it's an endearing bravo to all who were involved. A++
2004-01-01
The best cinematic meditation on greed since "Treasure of the Sierra Madre"...
Belfast-based comics writer Garth Ennis said it best: "There are two kinds of people in the world, my friend...those who dig Clint Eastwood movies...and dweebs." While I have to admit that my heart belongs to the opening act of "The Man With No Name" trilogy, "A Fistful of Dollars", there is no denial in my mind that "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" is actually the better film. Many directors have tried imitating it's style (including Don Siegel's substandard "Hang 'Em High" and Eastwood's own first Western offering as star/director in "High Plains Drifter"), but none have truly come close to the eccentricities on display here.

I have a suspicion that the storyline is actually based on historical fact. Consider this account from Joel Rose's "The Big Book of Thugs" under the entry of "The Reynolds Gang": They were organized in 1863 by Texans Jim and John Reynolds. They were briefly interned in a Civil War prison camp for Confederate sympathizers and after being released, began making robberies that, according to Jim Reynolds, were to help out Jefferson Davis and the Confederacy. The loot was buried somewhere in the area of Handcart Gulch and Spanish Peaks in Colarado Territory and later, after Jim Reynolds and four members of his gang had been executed by Colonel John M. Chivington of the Union Army, John Reynolds, dying from a fatal wound during a holdup, supposedly whispered out the location of his old gang's ill gotten loot. Unlike the movie version, it was never found.

Regardless of whether or not this was the actual basis for TGTBATU, it is nevertheless a film more grounded in history than a lot of it's comtemparies and, indeed, more than a few of it's successors. The Civil War is part of the backdrop, but it does so on a forgotten front of that war, the Western theater. Most high-school history classes would have us believe that nothing happened out West, but plenty did. In fact, the last skirmish of the war, if I'm not mistaken, was in New Mexico and, ironically enough, a Confederate victory.

The central of this film is greed. You don't just see it in the quest for the Confederate gold by Blondie, Angel Eyes, and Tuco. There are signs of it everywhere; in the hotel manager talking about how he'll be glad to get the Northerners in town for the money they'll bring in, Bill Carson appealing to Tuco's greed for a single sip of water, the gang of cutthroats who are systematically robbing the Confederate prisoners of their goods. Set up against the harsh desert backdrop, it exposes the ultimate folly of that greed (the best symbol of it perhaps being the cemetary where the gold is buried). A little over a decade before the Reagan era of "Greed is healthy, greed is good", this film provides the ultimate rebuttal to that argument. Greed has gotten just as many men killed, if not more, than patriotism ever did. Such a subtext makes "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" the cinematic child of John Huston's "Treasure of the Sierra Madre" and the precursor to Oliver Stone's "Wall Street".

As great as Leone, Eastwood, Van Cleef, and Wallach are, there is one member of this team that pushs this film into the status of greatness: score writer Ennio Morricone. Not only does he manage to write one of the most recognized theme tunes on the planet, he also adds the extra tension needed to convey the drama with the necessary oomph, the best examples being in Blondie's torturous walk across the desert, Tuco's frantic search through the cemetary (my personal favorite and so good that Lucasarts did a slowed-down version of it for their western shooter, "Outlaws"), and, of course, the final three way shoot-out. He still composes scores for many other films to this day, I've been told. A good example of his most recent work would be the 1990 version of "Hamlet" starring Mel Gibson and directed by Franco Zefferelli. But I truly doubt that he'll ever be able to top the legendary work he did here.
2000-08-26
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