Buy Double Indemnity movie online, buy Double Indemnity 1944 online, buy Double Indemnity movie download, Double Indemnity movie buy online, where can i buy the movie Double Indemnity, where can i buy Double Indemnity movie, where can you buy Double Indemnity the movie, where to buy Double Indemnity movie?
Buy Double Indemnity 1944 Online (mkv, avi, flv, mp4) DVDRip
Year:
1944
Country:
USA
Genre:
Crime, Drama, Thriller, Film-Noir
IMDB rating:
8.4
Director:
Billy Wilder
Fred MacMurray as Walter Neff
Barbara Stanwyck as Phyllis Dietrichson
Edward G. Robinson as Barton Keyes
Porter Hall as Mr. Jackson
Jean Heather as Lola Dietrichson
Tom Powers as Mr. Dietrichson
Byron Barr as Nino Zachetti
Richard Gaines as Edward S. Norton, Jr.
Fortunio Bonanova as Sam Garlopis
John Philliber as Joe Peters
George Anderson as Warden at Execution (scenes deleted)
Al Bridge as Execution Chamber Guard (scenes deleted)
Edward Hearn as Warden's Secretary (scenes deleted)
Boyd Irwin as First Doctor at Execution (scenes deleted)
George Melford as Second Doctor at Execution (scenes deleted)
William O'Leary as Chaplain at Execution (scenes deleted)
Storyline: In 1938, Walter Neff, an experienced salesman of the Pacific All Risk Insurance Co., meets the seductive wife of one of his clients, Phyllis Dietrichson, and they have an affair. Phyllis proposes to kill her husband to receive the proceeds of an accident insurance policy and Walter devises a scheme to receive twice the amount based on a double indemnity clause. When Mr. Dietrichson is found dead on a train-track, the police accept the determination of accidental death. However, the insurance analyst and Walter's best friend Barton Keyes does not buy the story and suspects that Phyllis has murdered her husband with the help of another man.
Type Resolution File Size Codec Bitrate Format
HQ DVD-rip 640x480 px 1451 Mb mpeg4 1735 Kbps avi Download
DVD-rip 544x416 px 676 Mb msmpeg4 880 Kbps avi Download
iPhone 320x240 px 176 Mb h264 239 Kbps mp4 Download
Reviews
One of the best films noir ever, Double Indemnity communicates with amazing effectiveness the depths of depravity, greed, lust, and betrayal of the seemingly innocent and beautiful.
This is one of the best films of all time, not necessarily because of its story but because of the acting, direction, cinematography, lighting, and just the way that the story itself was told. At the time the film was released, the idea of revealing who the killer was in the opening scene was virtually unheard of, but it ended up being very effective because it allowed the audience to concentrate more on other elements of the film, which was the goal of Billy Wilder, the director. Instead of trying to figure out who the perpetrator was, there is more emphasis on how the crime was pulled off, what mistakes were made during the murder, who betrayed who, how close Barton Keyes (the insurance investigator) was getting to solving the case, and, probably most importantly, what kind of person Walter Neff is and whether or not sympathy should be felt toward him.

Barbara Stanwyck, in one of the most remembered performances of her extensive career, represents (with nearly flawless ease) the cold and ruthless manipulator who has no difficulty in ruining other people's lives in various ways (including death, if necessary) in order to get what she wants. Known in the film community as the `femme fatale,' this is someone who uses her sexual prowess, seductiveness, and emotional detachment to drag an unsuspecting person (generally an interested man) into a scheme from which she is expected to benefit heavily and he is most likely headed for destruction. In these types of films, the man often either finds his life in ruins or ends up dead, as is often (but not always) also the case with the fate of the femme fatale.

Barbara Stanwyck (as Phyllis Dietrichson, the murderous femme fatale in Double Indemnity) and Fred MacMurray (as Walter Neff, her ‘victim'), have amazing chemistry on screen. Their attraction is incredibly well portrayed, and the development of their relationship with each other is so convincing that what happens between them almost seems normal. Besides that, their mutually calculated interaction, although it seems at first like it has been rehearsed endlessly and ultimately brought unconvincingly to the screen, is exactly as it was meant to be, because it represents each character's intentions, even very subtly foreshadowing their future betrayals against each other. Phyllis has gone through every word she ever says to Walter in her head. She has practiced what she wants to say when she brings up the idea of life insurance to Walter in the beginning and she knows what she wants to say whenever they interact with each other because she has been planning for quite some time the prospect of murdering her husband in order to collect his fortune. Walter, conversely, methodically makes amorous advances as though this is something that he does regularly, and then ultimately he also plans out his conversations with Phyllis because he begins to suspect her and is sure to tell her only what he wants her to hear. This seemingly stiff dialogue brilliantly represents Phyllis and Walter's precise (and sinister) intentions, and it's quick pace creates a feeling of urgency and restlessness.

Probably the most fascinating and entertaining actor in the film, Edward G. Robinson, plays Barton Keyes, Walter's friend and employer at the insurance company where he works. Keyes is a very suspicious man who closely investigates the insurance claims which come into the company, having a striking history of accurately isolating fraudulent claims and throwing them out. His handling of Phyllis's (and Walter's, technically) claim and the way that he gets closer and closer to the truth create a great atmosphere of tension and drama.

Double Indemnity is nearly flawless. From the shocking and unexpected beginning to the already known but still surprising end, the audience is held rapt by the excellent performances, the brilliant and imaginative direction, and the flawlessly created atmosphere. This is excellent, excellent filmmaking, and is a classic film that should not be missed.
2000-11-08
Sharp. Really sharp.
This is a dynamite piece of filmmaking by Billy Wilder. Wilder is in my opinion a very underrated director, much like John Houston. The acting is in top form from all of the players. The cinematography is crisp, and beautiful. The sound is nice and clear, and the direction is arguably some of Wilder's best. However, the real star is the screenplay. First off, it was taken from excellent source material. James Cain is always great for a story where nobody wins out. Check out The Postman Always Rings Twice for an example. But it is Chandler who I think really put this one on the map. Chandler has a way with dialogue that makes it all ring in your ears. The lines are smooth, and the characters always say something that makes me wish I could be that clever and smooth in everyday situations. Chandler knows dialogue, Chandler knows LA, and Chandler knows how to deliver a story. Check out any of his novels, and you will see this. This is a teamup that I really wish would have happened again. Oh well. If you don't mind voice over narration, then this is a film for you.
2004-02-26
As Noir as it gets
Double Indemnity (1944) follows insurance salesman Walter Neff (Fred MacMurray) who gets involved in a plot with Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck) to murder her husband for the insurance money. It certainly had a sort of noir all star crew; Wilder directing and writing with Raymond Chandler based on a book by James M. Cain. In my opinion, the score by Miklos Rozsa elevates Double Indemnity above the rest of the pack. It's varied and rich and creates suspense, very mature for the 1940s. The writing is beautiful and tragic, and the dialogue cracks like a whip. Los Angeles looks classic and is beautifully shot.
2014-12-07
A planned and committed murder
Interesting plot of this thriller. An attractive woman (Stanwyck) married to a man much older than her, who was previously married or was widow, with a daughter from his first marriage, live in a very tense relations. She did not want to continue living with his husband and detested his daughter. At this point, an agent from an insurance company (MacMurray) thrived as an 'angel' for Stanwyck, he proposed different assurances, one of them foresaw insurance in case of an accidental death, but he also felt in love with Stanwyck. This passion led to a planned murder that was committed nearly perfectly. But another intelligent person (Edward G. Robinson), the boss of MacMurray in the insurance company, step by step started to discover the plot for murder. This is a film with very modest means if you compare with those presently in use, but it is of a very high quality. Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray showed their class, but the best acting came from that 'monster' of the screen named Edward G. Robinson, who acted perfectly. Looking the way he did one may think that he was not an actor but simply the real boss of the insurance company.
2002-11-01
Great Classic
If you are a fan of the classics, and have not seen this movie, WHY NOT? This truly is one of the great ones. I enjoyed the "old school" language in the movie. I think one of my biggest enjoyments was seeing Fred MacMurray as a bad guy. I have seen this guy in many shows and movies as the good guy for many years. The best one in the flick (in my opinion) has got to be Edward G. Robinson, classic, classic indeed.
2004-01-13
Didn't Get The Money. Didn't Get The Girl.
*Possible Spoilers!*

Released in 1944 - Double Indemnity's story of vicious betrayal may be somewhat flawed and inconsistent - And, its 3 principal actors may have been miscast (especially Barbara Stanwyck as the deceitfully wicked femme fatale in a really cheap-looking wig) - But, overall, it's quite easy to see why this vintage, Hollywood Crime/Drama is considered to be a true "classic" of 1940s Film Noir.

Containing plenty of loaded dialog, shadowy settings and frequent flashes of well-timed tension, Double Indemnity's story of murder and deception comes together quite nicely like that of a master jigsaw puzzle where all of the scattered pieces of its plot-line eventually become one.

Even though I view Double Indemnity as essentially a "Chick Flick", its story is told (chiefly in long flashbacks) by a man who was directly involved in this double-crossing crime-of-passion that went seriously haywire.

Fred MacMurray plays Walter Neff, an over-confident, yet naively gullible insurance salesman, who, thinking that he's got it all figured out, gets played for an all-time sucker when the seductive, well-to-do Mrs. Dietrichson snares him into a diabolical plot to kill her husband in order to collect $100,000 through the double indemnity clause in his life insurance policy.

Needless to say, once Neff gets himself completely tangled up in a web of establishing alibis (while setting the wheels of the "perfect" crime into motion), things literally begin to come apart at the seams once he inadvertently learns about the treacherous activities (both past and present) of the calculating and conniving Mrs. Dietrichson.

Filmed in glossy b&w, Double Indemnity's story was co-written by the famed crime-novelist, Raymond Chandler. It was directed by Billy Wilder, known for such other notable films as - Sunset Boulevard, Stalag 17, The Seven Year Itch, and Some Like It Hot.
2013-10-22
The greatest film noir of all time
Now here's something you don't see everyday: A black and white crime classic about an insurance salesman who kills a man. Your probably thinking, What's this idiot on about. Well isn't the murderer a godfather or hit-man? Or maybe I haven't seen enough film noir, Either way this is a great movie, Possibly the best black & white along with Schindler's List and Psycho.

It's got amazing suspense, great acting and the special edition is coming out. Here are some reasons to buy it: -It got #69 in the top 250 -It's got non stop thrills -It's got a perfect romantic picture What's not to love?
2005-09-17
"I love you too."
Mere words cannot express my love for this film. This movie is a crystallization of silver screen perfection, a rare event where every little thing aligns to bestow the lucky viewers with what can only be described as breathtaking art.

The performances in this movie are superb. In a script riddled with hardboiled dialog and outlandish implausibilities, everyone hits the right note, and makes the endeavor compelling. Stanwyck is at her most seductive and powerful, and Edward G. Robinson gives the movie the perfect moral ground.

But the best performance has to be given to Fred MacMurray who turns the clichéd role of a man seduced by a woman into something more than the sleaze bag he should be. He becomes a character you're invested in, a man who is shaken from his complacent life and thoroughly destroyed by the demons he creates. And through this all, through murder in its many incarnations, you still can't help feel for the man. The character of Walter Neff, in so many words, takes on a life of its own thanks to MacMurray, and keeps the audience compelled no matter what sins he commits. The tics and libido exuded add to his charm and make him deservedly one of the most iconic characters of all time.

A lot of this credit must be given to Billy Wilder, my personal favorite director and a man whose films can all be completely different but possess enough tics to be instantly recognizable. The beauty of his shots and the set up of the script blend perfectly, creating a universe that is tangible and complex.

If you have not seen this movie, please do.
2006-07-12
Some times, when they least expect it.....
There are occasional times when all the elements come together to make a great film that will stand the passing of time. "Double Indemnity" seems to be an example of this phenomenon.

First, there was a great novel by one of America's best mystery writers, James Cain, who created these characters that seem will live forever in our imagination. Then, the lucky break in getting the right man to direct it, Billy Wilder, a man who knew about how to make a classic out of the material that he adapted with great care and elegance with Raymond Chandler, a man who knew about the genre.

"Double Indemnity" works because it's a story we can relate to. There is a greedy woman trapped in a bad marriage, who sees the opportunity when she encounters an insurance agent who is instantly smitten with her and who has only sex in his mind. The manipulator, Phyllis Dietrichson, doesn't need much to see how Walter desires her. His idea of having her husband sign an insurance policy he knows nothing about, thinking he is doing something else, will prove a fatal flaw in judgment.

Mr. Wilder achieves in this film what others try, with disastrous results. The director, who was working under the old Hays Code, shows so much sex in the film with fully clothed actors, yet one feels the heat exuding from the passion Walter Neff feels for Phyllis. He is a man that will throw everything away because he is blinded by the promise of what his life will be once the husband is out of the picture.

In life, as well as in fiction, there are small and insignificant things that will derail the best laid plans. First, there i Jackson, the man who shouldn't have been smoking at the rear of the train, contemplating the passing landscape. Then, no one counts in the ability of Barton Keys, the man in the agency who has seen it all! Walter and Phyllis didn't take that into consideration and it will backfire on their plan.

We try to make a point to take a look at "Double Indemnity" when it shows on cable from time to time. Barbara Stanwyck makes a magnificent Phyllis. There are no false movements in her performance. Phyllis gets under Walter's skin because she knows where her priorities lie and makes good use of them in order to render Walter helpless under her spell.

Fred McMurray makes a perfect Walter. He is consumed by his passion and he will do anything because of what he perceives will be the reward for doing the crime. Walter Neff was perhaps Mr. McMurray's best creation. He is completely believable and vulnerable.

Edgar G. Robinson, as Barton Keys, makes one of his best performances for the screen. Keys is a man that has seen all the schemes pass by his desk. He is, in a way, Walter's worst nightmare, because working next to Keys, he gets to know how wrong he was in the planning of the crime.

The supporting cast is excellent. Porter Hall, Jean Heather, Tom Powers, Richard Gaines, Fortunio Buonanova and John Philliber are perfect.

The music score of Miklos Rosza gives the film a texture and a dimension that capitalizes on the action it intends to enhance. Also the music of Cesar Franck and Franz Schubert contribute to the atmosphere of the movie. The great cinematography of John Seitz, who will go on to direct films, is another asset in the movie. Edith Head's costumes are absolutely what a woman like Phyllis would wear right down to her ankle bracelet.

This film shows a great man at his best: Billy Wilder!
2005-07-17
One of the Greats
This movie was fantastic. Definitely one of the twenty best films of all-time, maybe 10. The plot was so good that it even put Hitchcock to shame. This is one of the few times that a movie did justice to the book. In this case the movie might have even been better than the book. This is one of those movies where I cannot find a flaw, anywhere in it. In a sense it was a perfect movie. There is not one genre to define this movie. It has romance, crime, noir, mystery, with emphasis on the last 3 in heavy dosages. All I can say is, for those who haven't seen it, you don't know what your missing.
2002-03-04
Georgina Fisher (Houston) Maybe you are looking Billy Wilder for where can i buy the movie Double Indemnity? Here you can download it legally. Anne Tran (Indianapolis) It is very likely that you want to find a website Crime, Drama, Thriller, Film-Noir where can i buy Double Indemnity movie 1944? You are moving in the right direction and are in the right place! Donald Conrad (Brooklyn) Favorite actors: Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck, Edward G. Robinson, Porter Hall, Jean Heather, Tom Powers, Byron Barr, Richard Gaines, Fortunio Bonanova, John Philliber, George Anderson, Al Bridge, Edward Hearn, Boyd Irwin, George Melford, William O'Leary, Lee Shumway in search of an answer to the question where can you buy Double Indemnity the movie USA? You have found this Crime, Drama, Thriller, Film-Noir genre on this page. Darren Conley (Dallas) Among the huge collection of films in 1944 in the formats mkv, mp4, avi, mov, and flv it was difficult to find where to buy Double Indemnity movie? But my favorite film director Billy Wilder shot this film in the USA in 1944.
×